Wendy Taylor

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Wendy Taylor
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By the latest Proterozoic, some 560 million years ago, glaciers had three times covered the Earth perhaps even to its equator, creating what some have called "snowball Earth." The continents that came to dominate the next era – the Paleozoic – were already in position. And a strange new group of organisms called the Ediacaran fauna came to dominate the world's oceans. #science #geology #paleontology #fossils #precambrian #continentaldrift #tectonic #earth

By the latest Proterozoic, some 560 million years ago, glaciers had three times covered the Earth perhaps even to its equator, creating what some have called “"snowball Earth.”“ The continents that came to dominate the next era – the Paleozoic – were alre

Trespassia wardae

Trespassia wardae

charnia - Google Search

Charnia is the genus name given to a frond-like Ediacaran Mya) life-form with segmented, leaf-like ridges branching alternately to the right and left from a zig-zag medial suture.

Namacalathus

Namacalathus

In What Habitats Did The Ediacaran Organisms Live?

Watch Dr Phoebe Cohen and Dr Jim Gehling explain where the Ediacaran organisms lived and how they survived.

Beothukis mistakensis

Beothukis mistakensis

Extinction Week: End-Ediacaran Extinction

photo by Jean Just, et al. When you think of animals, think of this unusual creature, Dendrogramma enigmatica. These mushroom-shaped animals were discovered off the coast of Australia in They.

Culmofron plumosa

Culmofron plumosa

Eventually, though, these pioneering multicellulars evolved into the first actually large organisms - the Ediacaran Biota.

Extinction Week: End-Ediacaran Extinction

Life in the Ediacaran. Selenium isotope study shows "slow fuse" of oxygen leading to complex life over 100 million years or so.

New study links gradual increase of oxygen over 100 million years to an explosion of life on Earth around 580 million years ago.

Ediacara fauna. These fauna represent an important landmark in the evolution of life on Earth: they immediately predate the explosion of life-forms at the beginning of the Cambrian Period 541 million years ago. | paleontology | Encyclopedia Britannica

Spriggina: fossil [Credit: Courtesy, University of California Museum of Paleontology, www.