African savannah isn’t the homogenous, steady monotony that it appears on the Discovery Channel. Dirt roads and hills criss-cross it, and fever trees like this one grow where more water is available. The yellow-green bark comes from photosynthetically active cells. The name comes from an interesting illustration of the post hoc ergo propter hoc fallacy: when early European settlers went near water, they tended to contract malaria (thus the fever).

African savannah isn’t the homogenous, steady monotony that it appears on the Discovery Channel. Dirt roads and hills criss-cross it, and fever trees like this one grow where more water is available. The yellow-green bark comes from photosynthetically active cells. The name comes from an interesting illustration of the post hoc ergo propter hoc fallacy: when early European settlers went near water, they tended to contract malaria (thus the fever).

Did you know that #FeverTree photosynthesizes through its bark? This tree is native to eastern and southern Africa and it tends to grow in swampy areas: early European settlers noted that malarial fever was contracted in

Did you know that #FeverTree photosynthesizes through its bark? This tree is native to eastern and southern Africa and it tends to grow in swampy areas: early European settlers noted that malarial fever was contracted in

Pinterest
Search