Tenikwa Wildlife Rehabilitation

Our role as a rehabilitator is to give the animal a second chance at life. The animal may choose to fight, or give up the will to live. We respect that choice, although sometimes it is very hard to say good-bye.
Two Black-necked gulls where brought to Tenikwa on 31 Aug 2014. They were found on Keurbooms Beach. They were attached to each other with fishing line. One had it wrapped around his wing and the other had 2 fishing hooks stuck in his throat. We had to operate to remove the hooks from his esophagus. They are both recovering well.

Two Black-necked gulls where brought to Tenikwa on 31 Aug 2014. They were found on Keurbooms Beach. They were attached to each other with fishing line. One had it wrapped around his wing and the other had 2 fishing hooks stuck in his throat. We had to operate to remove the hooks from his esophagus. They are both recovering well.

Polly, our animal keeping trying to reunite the young otter with her mother. We suspect that her mother was shot dead and thus, Tenikwa will now rehabilitate her back into the wild. The reason why we tried to reunite the otter with her mother is due to the fact that the mother looks after their offspring for up to two years of age.

Polly, our animal keeping trying to reunite the young otter with her mother. We suspect that her mother was shot dead and thus, Tenikwa will now rehabilitate her back into the wild. The reason why we tried to reunite the otter with her mother is due to the fact that the mother looks after their offspring for up to two years of age.

This Young Cape Clawless Otter which is approximately 5-8 weeks old was rescued by a local farmer in Titsikamma as she was found abandoned. She arrived late on Wednesday evening and was well looked after by our animal keepers as she was in very critical condition. On Thursday and Friday, we tried to reunite her with her mom and drove out to the locality but it proved to be unsuccessful.

This Young Cape Clawless Otter which is approximately 5-8 weeks old was rescued by a local farmer in Titsikamma as she was found abandoned. She arrived late on Wednesday evening and was well looked after by our animal keepers as she was in very critical condition. On Thursday and Friday, we tried to reunite her with her mom and drove out to the locality but it proved to be unsuccessful.

This penguin was found stranded on a local beach in Knysna and brought in by Eve Joubert.  His overall condition was fine and he has been successfully transferred to SANCCOB Eastern Cape.

This penguin was found stranded on a local beach in Knysna and brought in by Eve Joubert. His overall condition was fine and he has been successfully transferred to SANCCOB Eastern Cape.

This Penguin was found stranded on a local beach in Plettenberg Bay as he was found in between the rocks.  He had some minor injuries but his overall condition was fine.  He has been successfully transferred to SANCCOB Eastern Cape.

This Penguin was found stranded on a local beach in Plettenberg Bay as he was found in between the rocks. He had some minor injuries but his overall condition was fine. He has been successfully transferred to SANCCOB Eastern Cape.

This Cape Cormorant was found wondering the streets of Plettenberg Bay and brought into Tenikwa.The overall condition was fine on arrival and responding well to treatment.He is currently being monitored and loves his outside enclosure.We will hopefully be releasing him soon, back into the wild where he belongs.

This Cape Cormorant was found wondering the streets of Plettenberg Bay and brought into Tenikwa.The overall condition was fine on arrival and responding well to treatment.He is currently being monitored and loves his outside enclosure.We will hopefully be releasing him soon, back into the wild where he belongs.

This Penguin was found stranded in the Featherbed Nature Reserve and brought into Tenikwa.His overall condition is fine and weighing 2kg.We are hoping to transfer him to SANCCOB within the next few days.Did you know: African Penguins live in colonies on 24 islands and along the coast between Namibia and Port Elizabeth. African Penguins can hold their breath on a dive for an average of 2.5 minutes

This Penguin was found stranded in the Featherbed Nature Reserve and brought into Tenikwa.His overall condition is fine and weighing 2kg.We are hoping to transfer him to SANCCOB within the next few days.Did you know: African Penguins live in colonies on 24 islands and along the coast between Namibia and Port Elizabeth. African Penguins can hold their breath on a dive for an average of 2.5 minutes

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