When I was a kid I asked my mom what that sign means (it was all over back in the days)... She had no answer

Apartheid in South Africa The bench is empty but this young black woman in a Johannesburg railway station would be breaking the law if she sat on it.

Helen Suzman: 1917-2009; Born to Lithuanian Jewish immigrants, Helen Suzman was a white South African legislator who for many years was the only government official to speak out against apartheid measures. Elected to Parliament in 1953, she advocated for the disenfranchised and was in constant conflict with her colleagues. After leaving office in 1989, she continued her activism for human rights and democracy.

Helen Suzman: Born to Lithuanian Jewish immigrants, Helen Suzman was a white South African legislator who for many years was the only government official to speak out against apartheid measures. Elected to Parliament in she advocated for

24 Startling Photos That Explain Apartheid In South Africa

24 Startling Photos That Explain Apartheid In South Africa

Woman and Child-Soweto

Child Art, Xhosa, Travel South Africa, Zulu, Babywearing, Le Sud, Black Women, Natural Hair, Afro

Apartheid: All-black trains, Johannesburg 1966–7, by Ernest Cole. Museum no. E.71-2003, Given by John and Judith Hillelson, © Estate of Ernest Cole

Apartheid: All-black trains, Johannesburg by Ernest Cole. Given by John and Judith Hillelson, © Estate of Ernest Cole

Crowds fleeing as police open fire on peaceful protestors, killing at least 69 and injuring 180 people (Sharpeville Massacre) On 21 March 1960 the PAC organized a protest in Sharpeville, a town south of Johannesburg. The aim was to highlight the injustices of the Pass Laws, which required Black Africans to carry a pass book at all times that contained personal and employment information. The pass book was seen as a symbol of apartheid. Despite the non-violent nature of the protest it was…

The Turn to Violence During 1959 and violence broke out in several South African cities. In March 1960 police fired upon a crowd protesting against the pass laws in Sharpeville, killing at least 69 people and injuring many others.

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