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One of my favorite ways to start a small group Bible study or a Girls’ Night is by printing off a list of conversation starter questions, cutting them in slips, dumping them in a bowl and letting everyone draw out a few to answer. I thought I’d share them with you today and maybe you can [...]

Cover a ball in questions (be creative!), sit in a circle and toss the ball around, answer the question that your right hand thumb lands on. Could also be themed for party games/ice breakers (baby shower, bridal shower, bachelorette pa

Editable Paragraph of the Week for daily paragraph writing practice! 60 writing prompt activities that make writing fun! Includes rubrics, drafting pages, revising and editing checklists, and tons of high-interest writing prompts.

Editable Paragraph of the Week for daily paragraph writing practice! 60 writing prompt activities that make writing fun! Includes rubrics, drafting pages, revising and editing checklists, and tons of high-interest writing prompts.

Classroom Crime Scene writing activity. How fun!

I am super excited about the lessons on inferring that I taught my graders today! It is so much fun when we can do something differ.

Inference game: Put "clean" garbage in a bag for each group. Have group guess whose trash it is, how many people might live the house, what their interests are, etc. all by using their inference skills of the evidence set before them. This is also a good beginning of the year activity to introduce kids to CCSS's evidence-based answers. This could even be done at a writing station.

Inference game: Put "clean" garbage in a bag for each group. Have group guess whose trash it is, how many people might live the house, what their interests are, etc. all by using their inference skills of the evidence set before them.

Who's your neighbor? The students had five different bags of trash (five different neighbors). They had to sort through the evidence to make inferences about each piece all leading up to drawing a final conclusion. Did one of these neighbors commit the crime?

Who's your neighbor? The students had five different bags of trash (five different neighbors). They had to sort through the evidence to make inferences about each piece all leading up to drawing a final conclusion. Did one of these neighbors commit the crime?