Coffee Pot by Pavel Janák (Czech, 1882–1956). Date: ca. 1912.  Manufacturer: Werkstätte Artel. Medium: Earthenware, ceramics. Who: Janák utilised geometric patterning which was synonymous with Czech Cubism. The movement and with it Janák, aimed to add a controversial element to contemporary designs of the time.  Reference: The Metropolitan Museum of Art. 2000. Coffee Pot. Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History. [Online]. Available: http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/2000.173a,b/

Coffee Pot, ca. Pavel Janàk (Czech, The angular form and boldly abstract graphic patterning of this coffeepot are characteristic of Czech Cubism. Black and white coffee pot.

Geometric coffee set by Helen Hughes Dulany. When: 1934. Material: Stainless Steal, Bakelite. Dulany was part of the Art Deco movement and one of the first designers to use Bakelite, a plastic which at the time was being used in the automobile industry, for it's heat resistant properties.  Reference: The Metropolitan Museum of Art. 2000. Collection Records. Coffee Service. [Online]. Available: http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/490727

Coffee service 1934 Helen Hughes DULANY (American, Bismarck, North Dakota New York, New York) Stainless steel, Bakelite (hva)

Coffeepot by Jean E. Puiforcat (1897–1945). Date: 1922. Medium: Silver, lapis lazuli, and ivory. Puiforcat was an Art deco designer who attempted to distance himself from the previous generation's naturalism. In the coffeepot the lapis lazuli plays a functional role as well as decorative, due to its insulating feature. Reference: The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Coffeepot. metmuseum. [Online]. Available: Follow Link.

Coffeepot by Jean E. Puiforcat (1897–1945). Date: 1922. Medium: Silver, lapis lazuli, and ivory. Puiforcat was an Art deco designer who attempted to distance himself from the previous generation's naturalism. In the coffeepot the lapis lazuli plays a functional role as well as decorative, due to its insulating feature. Reference: The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Coffeepot. metmuseum. [Online]. Available: Follow Link.

Coffee Pot, Part of Coffee Service by Sigvard Bernadotte (1907 - 2002). Date ca. 1939. Medium: Silver and wood.  Bernadotte was a swedish industrial designer who originally was a prince, until he lost his title when he chose to marry a commoner in 1934. Bernadotte designed in silver for Georg Jensen as well plastic items for the common household. Reference: The Metropolitan Museum of Art. metmuseum. [ Online]. Available: Follow link.

Coffee Pot, Part of Coffee Service Designer: Sigvard Bernadotte (Swedish, Drottningholm Castle (near Stockholm) Stockholm) Manufacturer: Georg Jensen (Danish, Rådvad Hellerup) Date: ca. 1939 Medium: Silver and wood

"Sintrax" Coffeepot by Gerhard Marcks (1889 - 1981) and Wilhelm Wagenfeld (1900 - 1990). Date: ca. 1934. Medium: Glass, rubber, and wood. Marcks, the artistic director of the ceramics workshop at the Bauhaus collaborated with one of his students, Wagenfeld, to create this coffeepot. Together they sought to emanate the Bauhaus's principles surrounding form and function within the coffeepot's design. Reference: The Metropolitan Museum of Art. "Sintrax" Coffeepot. [Online]. Available: Follow…

Gerhard Marcks, "Sintrax" Coffeepot, Coffee maker or science experiment? You decide. I like anything that resembles industrial labware; I've always been inclined towards utilitarian items in the kitchen (Pyrex etc).

Model 2000 Patina Coffee pot by Raymond Loewy and Richard S. Latham. Date: 1954. Medium: Glazed molded porcelain. This design is centered around a classic ideation of the modern design aesthetic with a view towards the future. The simple forms appealed to the American postwar consumers of the time. This led to over 20 million pieces being produced. Reference: Trope, C. 2014. A Collaboration For a New Century. Cooperhewitt. [Online]. Available: Follow Link.

Sugar Bowl And Lid, "Model 2000 (shape), Patina (pattern)", 1954 Raymond Loewy

Vacuum Flask by Landers Frary. Date: 1917. Medium: metal and glass. Vacuum flasks were invented at the beginning of the 20th century and were widely seen as a new form of technology. The concept was functional and could easily be incorporated into the modern consumers lifestyle. Reference: Trope, C. 2014. One for the road. Cooperhewitt. [Online]. Available: https://www.cooperhewitt.org/2014/09/16/one-for-the-road/

cinoh: glass vacuum bottle technology by scottish scientist sir james dewar

Coffeepot by Henry Dreyfuss (1904 - 1972). Date 1938. Medium: silverplate. Who: Henry Dreyfuss was an American designer who focused on designing products for consumers. In the later years of his life Henry became the president of the Industrial Design Society of America (IDSA).  Reference:  Industrial Designers Society of America.2016. Henry Dreyfuss. IDSA. [Online]. Available: http://www.idsa.org/content/henry-dreyfuss-fidsa

This set was designed by Henry Dreyfuss for the New York Central Railroad. International Silver Co. Designed by Henry Dreyfuss

Part of a coffee set by Josef Hoffmann. Date: 1909-1911. Manufacturer: Wiener Werkstatte factory. Medium: wood, silver alloy, silver. Technique: electroplated, ebonised. Who: Hoffmann played a pivotal role in the formation of the Secessionists in 1897. He later left and helped establish the Wiener Werkstatte where he designed a variety of products. Reference: The British Museum. Coffee-set / Coffee-pot. Collection online. [Online]. Available: Follow Link.

Part of a coffee set by Josef Hoffmann. Date: 1909-1911. Manufacturer: Wiener Werkstatte factory. Medium: wood, silver alloy, silver. Technique: electroplated, ebonised. Who: Hoffmann played a pivotal role in the formation of the Secessionists in 1897. He later left and helped establish the Wiener Werkstatte where he designed a variety of products. Reference: The British Museum. Coffee-set / Coffee-pot. Collection online. [Online]. Available: Follow Link.

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