Quote: “Don’t fire ‘til you see the whites of their eyes!”    Where it came from: Usually William Prescott is credited with saying this at the 1775 battle of Bunker Hill: “Don’t fire ‘til you see the whites of their eyes. Then, fire low!” However, he wasn’t the first. Frederick the Great said it in 1755 during the Seven Years War, and a British officer named Sir Andrew Agnew said the first recorded instance at Dettingen in 1743.

” Where it came from: Usually William Prescott is credited with saying this at the 1775 battle of Bunker Hill: “Don’t fire ‘til you see the whites of their eyes. Then, fire low!

A statue at the Vietnam women's memorial

Courtesy of the Vietnam Women’s Memorial Foundation.

Sybil Ludington, is considered to be the female equivalent of Paul Revere. At only 16 years old, she made a journey twice as long as Revere’s. Her father, Col. Ludington was the leader of the local militia. In April of 1777, Col. Ludington sent Sybil to warn the militia members in several other towns to prepare for the impending attack by the British. Sybil traveled 40 miles on horseback on a stormy night. Sybil was thanked for her help by George Washington who came to her home personally.

Henrietta Swan Leavitt Working at Harvard College Observatory precisely calibrated the photo magnitudes of 47 stars

Nathan Hale (June 6, 1755 – September 22, 1776) was a soldier for the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. He volunteered for an intelligence-gathering mission in New York City but was captured by the British. He is probably best remembered for his purported last words before being hanged: "I only regret that I have but one life to give for my country."

Nathan Hale ~ Teacher turned Patriot spy until captured and hung by the British. Right before he was hung, he was quoted saying "I regret I have but one life to give to my country.

Affiche formation utilisée de 1940 à 1945 / The french Red Cross is training nurses, social workers... Print used during WWII.

The french Red Cross is training nurses, social workers. Print used during WWII.

Gilt brass gorget worn by Captain Sir Francis Carr Clerke, 3rd Regiment of Foot Guards, 1777 (c) Carr Clerke (1748-1777) was killed at Saratoga in 1777, during the American War of Independence (1775-1783), while serving as aide-de-camp to Major-General John Burgoyne.  Crescent-shaped gorgets of silver or silver gilt were worn by officers in most European armies, both as a badge of rank and an indication that they were on duty;  discontinued by the British army in 1830.

Gorget worn by Captain Sir Francis Carr Clerke, Regiment of Foot Guards, 1777 (c)

Jorge Farragut was an Hispanic United States Navy officer during the American Revolutionary War. He also fought with the Continental infantry in battles in the South.

Jorge Farragut was an Hispanic United States Navy officer during the American Revolutionary War. He also fought with the Continental infantry in battles in the South.

A force of British infantry from a mixture of regiments punch out of a tightening circle of Continental Army and Marine soldiers during the battle of Princeton, January 3rd 1777. Art by Graham Turner.

A force of British infantry from a mixture of regiments punch out of a tightening circle of Continental Army and Marine soldiers during the battle of Princeton, January Art by Graham Turner.

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