Pinterest • The world’s catalogue of ideas

Explore these ideas and much more!

from Mail Online

The haunting faces of war: Startling pictures from America’s conflicts show more than 70 years of bloodshed

U.S. Marine Carlos 'OJ' Orjuela was photographed by Louie Palu after a mission in Helmand province. Exhibit of war photography at Houston Museum of FIne Arts.

Quagmire World War One - Mud on the Somme. Men actually drowned in the mud at the Battle of the Somme in 1916."We live in a world of Somme mud. We sleep in it, work in it, fight in it, wade in it and many of us die in it. We see it, feel it, eat it and curse it, but we can't escape it, not even by dying." Quote by Australian Private Edward Lynch

African-American soldier with a German child on his knee, Munich, 1945, (b/w photo)

Queen Elizabeth World War II Mechanic--not in color but too cool not to pin

Ничего сказать не могу... смотрим молча. Фотограф Александр Виноградов (6 фото)

from Mail Online

By Daily Mail Reporter

Images of Americans who fought in the Revolution are exceptionally rare because few of the Patriots of 1775-1783 lived until the dawn of practical photography in the early 1840s. These early photographs – known as daguerreotypes – are exceptionally rare camera-original, fully-identified photographs of veterans of the War for Independence.

from Getty Images

The start of a great race- drivers running to their automobiles. Belfast, Ireland. Photograph. August 19th 1929.

Young girl skips past patrolling British soldiers from the Gloucester Regiment, Belfast, Northern Ireland, 1972 by Oliver Morris/Getty

In Soviet Union women participating in WWII were erased from history, remaining as the occasional anecdote of a female sniper or simply as medical staff or, at best, radio specialists. The word “front-line girl” (frontovichka) became a terrible insult, synonimous to “whore”. Hundreds thousand of girls who went to war to protect their homeland with their very lives, who came back injured or disabled, with medals for valor, had to hide it to protect themselves from public scorn.