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Search the Collections | Canadian Museum of History

Search the Collections | Canadian Museum of History

Search the Collections | Canadian Museum of History

Search the Collections | Canadian Museum of History

File:Moccasins with porcupine bristles, eastern woodlands, 18th or early 19th century - Staatliches Museum für Völkerkunde München - DSC0846...

File:Moccasins with porcupine bristles, eastern woodlands, 18th or early 19th century - Staatliches Museum für Völkerkunde München - DSC0846...

Infinity of Nations: Art and History in the Collections of the National Museum of the American Indian - George Gustav Heye Center, New York

Infinity of Nations: Art and History in the Collections of the National Museum of the American Indian - George Gustav Heye Center, New York

A PAIR OF EASTERN WOODLANDS QUILLED HIDE MOCCASINS  of front seam construction, with verticle side seams and eyelet lacing, stitched with orange, black and white porcupine quills, each decorated with three verticle bands down the front and a curvilinear element on the heel, trimmed with painted red hide, separate soles

A PAIR OF EASTERN WOODLANDS QUILLED HIDE MOCCASINS of front seam construction, with verticle side seams and eyelet lacing, stitched with orange, black and white porcupine quills, each decorated with three verticle bands down the front and a curvilinear element on the heel, trimmed with painted red hide, separate soles

Search the Collections | Canadian Museum of History

Search the Collections | Canadian Museum of History

Charles Cotesworth Pinckney's gorget, c. 1750. During the American Revolution, both British and Patriot forces employed gorgets in their uniforms. This particular piece belonged to Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, signer of the United States Constitution and 1803 presidential candidate. The gorget itself was made by master Charleston Silversmith John Vanall. The engraving was very likely done sometime after the war as a commemorative gesture. Charleston Museum

Charles Cotesworth Pinckney's gorget, c. 1750. During the American Revolution, both British and Patriot forces employed gorgets in their uniforms. This particular piece belonged to Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, signer of the United States Constitution and 1803 presidential candidate. The gorget itself was made by master Charleston Silversmith John Vanall. The engraving was very likely done sometime after the war as a commemorative gesture. Charleston Museum

Seneca or Cayuga Pair of moccasins  Traditional, mid-19th century  Buckskin, porcupine quills, sinew

Seneca or Cayuga Pair of moccasins Traditional, mid-19th century Buckskin, porcupine quills, sinew

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