Explore The Photograph, Central Government, and more!

Explore related topics

Cavalry armor, detail view, 18th–19th c, Tibetan, possibly Bhutanese and Nepalese elements, iron, gold, copper alloy, wood, leather, and textile, assembled based on photographs taken in the 1930s and 1940s in the Tibetan capital of Lhasa during the Great Prayer Festival. The photographs showed troops of ceremonial armored cavalry, who wore a standardized set of equipment as stipulated by the central government of Tibet probably from the mid-seventeenth or eighteenth century onward. Met…

Cavalry armor, detail view, 18th–19th c, Tibetan, possibly Bhutanese and Nepalese elements, iron, gold, copper alloy, wood, leather, and textile, assembled based on photographs taken in the 1930s and 1940s in the Tibetan capital of Lhasa during the Great Prayer Festival. The photographs showed troops of ceremonial armored cavalry, who wore a standardized set of equipment as stipulated by the central government of Tibet probably from the mid-seventeenth or eighteenth century onward. Met…

Cavalry armor. Tibetian or Chinese

Tibetan lamelar armour, almost identical to Mongol lamelar armour. Perhaps in the tack room.

Tibetan cavalry armor, 18th to 19th century, possible Bhutanese and Nepalese elements, iron, gold, copper alloy, wood, leather, and textile, assembled based on photographs taken in the 1930s and 1940s in the Tibetan capital of Lhasa during the Great Prayer Festival. The photographs showed troops of ceremonial armored cavalry, who wore a standardized set of equipment as stipulated by the central government of Tibet probably from the mid-seventeenth or eighteenth century onward. Met museum.

Tibetan cavalry armor, 18th to 19th century, possible Bhutanese and Nepalese elements, iron, gold, copper alloy, wood, leather, and textile, assembled based on photographs taken in the 1930s and 1940s in the Tibetan capital of Lhasa during the Great Prayer Festival. The photographs showed troops of ceremonial armored cavalry, who wore a standardized set of equipment as stipulated by the central government of Tibet probably from the mid-seventeenth or eighteenth century onward. Met museum.

Persian char-aina (chahar-aina, chahar a’ineh). Literally the four mirrors. Four plates worn over a zirah (shirt of mail) in Persia, India and Central Asia. The armor plates can be rectangular or round, and the two plates worn on the breast and back are considerably larger than those worn at the sides which had recesses for the arms. During the 16th century, chahar aina cuirasses were introduced in Iran, front and pack panels.

Persian chahar a’ineh (the four mirrors), Four plates worn over a zirah (shirt of mail) , During the century, chahar aina cuirasses were introduced in Iran

Armor Porn — Indian (Maratha) Helmet and Armor from Hermitage...

Indian (Maratha) top (helmet) and char-aina (cuirass), Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg, Russia.

Ottoman armored boot, 16th century, steel plates connected by round riveted mail, height 415 mm, length 300 mmm, weight 2.85 kg. The plates covering the outside of the leg (the left) are extensively repairs and very little of the original remains. Royal Armouries.

Ottoman armored boot, century, steel plates connected by round riveted…

Indian (Mysore) peti (quilted armor), detail view of the helmet, c.1790, belonging to Tipu Sultan (The Tiger of Mysore), looted by British forces from his palace/fortress (Seringapatam) after his murder by the British in 1799. Tipu's motto was "better to live a single day as a tiger than a thousand years as a sheep", he succeeded his father, Haidar Ali, as ruler of the South Indian state of Mysore in 1782. Silk, brocade, silver thread. The Royal Palaces, Residences and Art Collection.

Indian (Mysore) peti (quilted armor), detail view of the helmet, belonging to Tipu Sultan (The Tiger of Mysore), looted by British forces from his palace/fortress (Seringapatam) after his murder by the British in 1799

Helmet [Turkish] (04.3.456a) | Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History | The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Helmet

Ottoman period Turkish Steel, damascened with gold The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Reconstructed helmet used by the elite Tang cavalry. Though mostly similar in construction, from 8-32 lames (linked plates) the Tang cavalry helmet also included a neck guard that protected the wearer's exposed throat.

Reconstructed helmet used by the elite Tang cavalry. Though mostly similar in construction, from lames (linked plates) the Tang cavalry helmet also included a neck guard that protected the wearer's exposed throat.

Ottoman chichak type helmet, end of 17th century, steel, copper, leather, velvet and silk. Stibbert Museum.

Ottoman type chichak helmet, end of century, steel, copper, leather…

Ottoman empire krug (chest armor), steel plates with riveted mail, as worn by fully armored cavalryman (sipahi) in conjunction with migfer (helmet), dizcek (cuisse or knee and thigh armor), zirah (mail shirt), kolluk/bazu band (vambrace/arm guards), and kolçak (greaves or shin armor).

Ottoman empire krug (chest armor), steel plates with riveted mail, as worn by…

Pinterest
Search