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Saegusa Shigeru before his execution at the Awadaguchi execution grounds outside of Kyoto, he was beheaded and his head was put on public display (sarashikubi) for his involvement in the attack on the delegation of the British Consul-General in Japan (Sir Harry Smith Parkes) to the Meiji Emperor, February 1868.

Hidashida Sadakata (Hayashida Sadaken?) after his execution at the Awadaguchi execution grounds outside of Kyoto, he was beheaded and his head was put on public display (sarashikubi) for his involvement in the attack on the delegation of the British Consul-General in Japan (Sir Harry Smith Parkes) to the Meiji Emperor, February 1868.

A tinted albumen print from a japanese album of the late 19th century. The caption says "A cooling man".

Saegusa Shigeru before his execution at the Awadaguchi execution grounds outside of Kyoto, he was beheaded and his head was put on public display (sarashikubi) for his involvement in the attack on the delegation of the British Consul-General in Japan (Sir Harry Smith Parkes) to the Meiji Emperor, February 1868.

This photograph by British photographer Frederik William Sutton shows accused collaborator Ichikawa Shaburo prior to his execution for being one of the attempted assassins of Sir Harry Parkes in 1868.

by Okinawa Soba, via Flickr. This 100-year-old hand colored photo is by an unknown photographer. Actually, it's a great image. The lighting, and her unique profile of a piercing gaze above her extended arm, gives a classic feel to the photo. Yet, the lines of the overwhelming obi that follow directly into her hair, and the high collar that erases all vestiges of a sensual nape of the neck (usually exposed by a low-slung kimono) makes this image anything but classical.

Hidashida Sadakata after his execution at the Awadaguchi execution grounds outside of Kyoto, he was beheaded and his head was put on public display (sarashikubi) for his involvement in the attack on the delegation of the British Consul-General in Japan (Sir Harry Smith Parkes) to the Meiji Emperor, February 1868.