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High up a mountain, only evergreens can survive. At the very top, there are only rocks and snow.| Plants Around the World | Kids Discover

High up a mountain, only evergreens can survive.

Vegetation Regions of North America  | Kids Discover

Vegetation Regions of North America

Before it erupted on May 18, 1980, Mount St. Helens was a perfectly shaped stratovolcano. It was formed by many eruptions over 40,000 years. The 1980 eruption tore 1,300 feet off the mountain’s top! It left the crater shaped like a horseshoe. | Famous Volcanoes | Kids Discover

Before it erupted on May Mount St. Helens was a perfectly shaped stratovolcano. It was formed by many eruptions over years. The 1980 eruption tore feet off the mountain’s top! It left the crater shaped like a horseshoe.

SULTAN Suleyman the Magnificent of Turkey (1494–1566) | Royal Life | Kids Discover

SULTAN Suleyman the Magnificent of Turkey (1494–1566) | Royal Life | Kids Discover

Grand Canyon, Arizona | Our Planet From Surface to Core | Kids Discover

Our planet, from surface to core

Savannahs are similar to temperate grasslands. But they have more trees and shrubs and receive more rain. Here, boys in Mozambique thatch a roof with elephant grass.  | Plants Around the World | Kids Discover

Savannahs are similar to temperate grasslands. But they have more trees and shrubs and receive more rain. Here, boys in Mozambique thatch a roof with elephant grass.

Deserts are the driest places on Earth. Cacti can live here because their stems have a thick coating that helps them store water longer than most plants. Other plants, such as mesquite trees, survive because they have roots up to 80 feet long, which take in water from deep underground. Pictured is a giant saguaro cactus. | Plants Around the World | Kids Discover

Deserts are the driest places on Earth. Cacti can live here because their stems have a thick coating that helps them store water longer than most plants. Other plants, such as mesquite trees, survive because they have roots up to 80 feet long, which take in water from deep underground. Pictured is a giant saguaro cactus. | Plants Around the World | Kids Discover

In the 1970s, we started using more resources than Earth could grow back. We also started making more waste than Earth could absorb. We’re using resources now faster than nature can replace them. Scientists figure we use about one and a half Earths worth of resources to support how we live. | The Environment | Kids Discover

In the 1970s, we started using more resources than Earth could grow back. We also started making more waste than Earth could absorb. We’re using resources now faster than nature can replace them. Scientists figure we use about one and a half Earths worth of resources to support how we live. | The Environment | Kids Discover

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