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At first, not many scientists agreed with the Alvarezes’ theory. Then, in 1990, geologists looking for oil off Mexico’s coast discovered a huge impact crater. It was buried under a mile of limestone. Underground imaging equipment showed that the crater fit the Alvarezes’ theory. It is exactly the right size and formed at exactly the right time to support their idea. | Meteors and Moon Rocks | Kids Discover

At first, not many scientists agreed with the Alvarezes’ theory. Then, in 1990, geologists looking for oil off Mexico’s coast discovered a huge impact crater. It was buried under a mile of limestone. Underground imaging equipment showed that the crater fit the Alvarezes’ theory. It is exactly the right size and formed at exactly the right time to support their idea. | Meteors and Moon Rocks | Kids Discover

Earth would have craters just like the Moon’s if it didn’t have an atmosphere. That layer of gases allows Earth to have climate and weather. Rain and wind erode old craters. Plants and water cover them up, and natural disasters cause changes. Canyon Diablo in Arizona (above) is a rare case of a giant impact crater that has survived pretty much intact. A 15,000-ton meteorite crashed there about 50,000 years ago. | Meteors and Moon Rocks | Kids Discover

Earth would have craters just like the Moon’s if it didn’t have an atmosphere. That layer of gases allows Earth to have climate and weather. Rain and wind erode old craters. Plants and water cover them up, and natural disasters cause changes. Canyon Diablo in Arizona (above) is a rare case of a giant impact crater that has survived pretty much intact. A 15,000-ton meteorite crashed there about 50,000 years ago. | Meteors and Moon Rocks | Kids Discover

Cloud forests are found all around the world, including in Central America, southern Mexico, South America, southeast Asia, Africa, Madagasc...

Cloud forests are found all around the world, including in Central America, southern Mexico, South America, southeast Asia, Africa, Madagasc...

A meteorite is a piece of meteor that lands on Earth. They usually burn up in the atmosphere before they hit. Most of the ones that do make it to Earth are small or break up on impact. The 15.5-ton Willamette meteorite landed in Oregon. It’s the biggest one ever found in the U.S. Scientists think it was the iron core of a planet that broke up billions of years ago. The largest meteorite in the world is the 60-ton Hoba meteorite in Namibia (above). | Meteors and Moon Rocks | Kids Discover

A meteorite is a piece of meteor that lands on Earth. They usually burn up in the atmosphere before they hit. Most of the ones that do make it to Earth are small or break up on impact. The 15.5-ton Willamette meteorite landed in Oregon. It’s the biggest one ever found in the U.S. Scientists think it was the iron core of a planet that broke up billions of years ago. The largest meteorite in the world is the 60-ton Hoba meteorite in Namibia (above). | Meteors and Moon Rocks | Kids Discover

The rare Fukang Meteorite looks more like a transparent mosaic than a chunk of rock from outer space.

The rare Fukang Meteorite looks more like a transparent mosaic than a chunk of rock from outer space.

Earth’s resources are limited. If we make changes to our lifestyle today, we can start protecting the environment for future generations. For example, wind is a nonpolluting and renewable energy source. We could use more wind turbines to generate electricity. | The Environment | Kids Discover

Earth’s resources are limited. If we make changes to our lifestyle today, we can start protecting the environment for future generations. For example, wind is a nonpolluting and renewable energy source. We could use more wind turbines to generate electricity. | The Environment | Kids Discover

Bedrock is the solid expanse of rock underlying everything on Earth. In most places, it’s buried beneath the soil or layers of gravel. But sometimes the rocky structure of our world peeks out. In Yosemite National Park, walls of bare granite rise thousands of feet into the air, posing a challenge to climbers. (Greg Epperson/ Shutterstock)

Bedrock is the solid expanse of rock underlying everything on Earth. In most places, it’s buried beneath the soil or layers of gravel. But sometimes the rocky structure of our world peeks out. In Yosemite National Park, walls of bare granite rise thousands of feet into the air, posing a challenge to climbers. (Greg Epperson/ Shutterstock)

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