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Elected mayor of Atlanta in 1973, Maynard Jackson was the first African American to serve as mayor of a major southern city

Elected mayor of Atlanta in 1973, Maynard Jackson was the first African American to serve as mayor of a major southern city

Teresa Graves spent a memorable season as a cast member of Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In (1969-70). After a highly successful 1974 TV movie, Get Christie Love!, she reprised the role in a weekly series (1974-75, ABC), becoming the first African American woman to star in her own hour-long TV drama series.

Teresa Graves spent a memorable season as a cast member of Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In (1969-70). After a highly successful 1974 TV movie, Get Christie Love!, she reprised the role in a weekly series (1974-75, ABC), becoming the first African American woman to star in her own hour-long TV drama series.

Maj. Robert H. Lawrence Jr. named first Black Astronaut . Maj. Lawrence successfully completed the Air Force Flight Test Pilot Training School at Edwards AFB, California. In the same month (June 30, 1967) he was selected by the USAF as an astronaut in the Air Force's Manned Orbital Laboratory (MOL) program, thus becoming the first black astronaut. He was killed during a training flight later on the same year.

Maj. Robert H. Lawrence Jr. named first Black Astronaut . Maj. Lawrence successfully completed the Air Force Flight Test Pilot Training School at Edwards AFB, California. In the same month (June 30, 1967) he was selected by the USAF as an astronaut in the Air Force's Manned Orbital Laboratory (MOL) program, thus becoming the first black astronaut. He was killed during a training flight later on the same year.

Saint Elmo Brady (December 22, 1884 - December 25, 1966) was the first African American to obtain a Ph.D. degree in chemistry in the United States, which he earned in 1916 from the University of Illinois. He taught at Tuskegee, Fisk, Howard and Tougaloo, and was the first African American admitted to Phi Lambda Upsilon, the chemistry honor society. #TodayInBlackHistory

Saint Elmo Brady (December 22, 1884 - December 25, 1966) was the first African American to obtain a Ph.D. degree in chemistry in the United States, which he earned in 1916 from the University of Illinois. He taught at Tuskegee, Fisk, Howard and Tougaloo, and was the first African American admitted to Phi Lambda Upsilon, the chemistry honor society. #TodayInBlackHistory

Journalist Ed Bradley  Bradley, the first African American at CBS to be a White House correspondent and a Sunday night anchor, covered a broad array of stories with insight and aplomb during his 39-year career, from war to politics to sensitive portraits of artists. He won virtually every broadcast news award -- some of them more than once.

Journalist Ed Bradley Bradley, the first African American at CBS to be a White House correspondent and a Sunday night anchor, covered a broad array of stories with insight and aplomb during his 39-year career, from war to politics to sensitive portraits of artists. He won virtually every broadcast news award -- some of them more than once.

Michele S. Jones was the first woman in the United States Army Reserve to reach the position of command sergeant major of the U.S. Army Reserve. She was the first female non-commissioned officer to serve in the highest enlisted position of a component of the U.S. Army, active or reserve, and was at one time the highest-ranking African-American female enlisted person in any branch of the United States military, as well as the highest-ranking enlisted African American in the Army Reserve.

Michele S. Jones was the first woman in the United States Army Reserve to reach the position of command sergeant major of the U.S. Army Reserve. She was the first female non-commissioned officer to serve in the highest enlisted position of a component of the U.S. Army, active or reserve, and was at one time the highest-ranking African-American female enlisted person in any branch of the United States military, as well as the highest-ranking enlisted African American in the Army Reserve.

History has credited Thomas Edison with the invention of the light bulb, but fewer people know about Lewis Latimer‘s innovations toward its development. Until Latimer’s process for making carbon filament, Edison’s light bulbs would only burn for a few minutes. Latimer’s filament burned for several hours.

History has credited Thomas Edison with the invention of the light bulb, but fewer people know about Lewis Latimer‘s innovations toward its development. Until Latimer’s process for making carbon filament, Edison’s light bulbs would only burn for a few minutes. Latimer’s filament burned for several hours.

Major General Marcelite J. Harris (born January 16, 1943, Houston, Texas) became the the first African-American female general of the United States Air Force. Born Marcelite Jordan to Cecil O'Neal Jordan and Marcelite Terrill Jordan, Sr., Jordan graduated from Spelman College, earning her B.A. of arts degree in speech and drama in 1964, before joining the Air Force

Major General Marcelite J. Harris (born January 16, 1943, Houston, Texas) became the the first African-American female general of the United States Air Force. Born Marcelite Jordan to Cecil O'Neal Jordan and Marcelite Terrill Jordan, Sr., Jordan graduated from Spelman College, earning her B.A. of arts degree in speech and drama in 1964, before joining the Air Force

Carter G. Woodson April 3, 1950 Death of Carter G. Woodson (74), "father of Black history," Washington, D.C. Carter Godwin Woodson (December 19, 1875 – April 3, 1950)[1] was an African-American historian, author, journalist and the founder of theAssociation for the Study of African American Life and History. Woodson was one of the first scholars to study African-American history. A founder of The Journal of Negro History in 1915, Woodson has been cited as the father of black history.[2] In…

Carter G. Woodson April 3, 1950 Death of Carter G. Woodson (74), "father of Black history," Washington, D.C. Carter Godwin Woodson (December 19, 1875 – April 3, 1950)[1] was an African-American historian, author, journalist and the founder of theAssociation for the Study of African American Life and History. Woodson was one of the first scholars to study African-American history. A founder of The Journal of Negro History in 1915, Woodson has been cited as the father of black history.[2] In…

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