LEARNING TO LIVE WITH EARWIGS- omnivorous, with a wide range of favorites: when there is nothing organic to break down and no insects to eat, they turn to plants, such as dahlia, rose, clematis, zinnia, coneflower and sunflower blooms, lettuce, beet and celery leaves, and also seedlings, including young bean plants, even the silk of corn.

LEARNING TO LIVE WITH EARWIGS- omnivorous, with a wide range of favorites: when there is nothing organic to break down and no insects to eat, they turn to plants, such as dahlia, rose, clematis, zinnia, coneflower and sunflower blooms, lettuce, beet and celery leaves, and also seedlings, including young bean plants, even the silk of corn.

Rose slug, a sawfly larva (Hymenoptera), and feeding damage on upper leaf surface of rose (Rosa) leaves

Rose slug, a sawfly larva (Hymenoptera), and feeding damage on upper leaf surface of rose (Rosa) leaves

Although usually considered a beneficial insect in the garden, large populations of earwigs can result in significant damage to garden plants. Their presence in large numbers can also be a bit unsettling. Here are some ways to keep their population in check.

Controlling Earwigs

Although usually considered a beneficial insect in the garden, large populations of earwigs can result in significant damage to garden plants. Their presence in large numbers can also be a bit unsettling. Here are some ways to keep their population in check.

Use a damp rolled up newspaper, corrugated cardboard or a short piece of hose and place on the soil near plants just before dark. Earwigs will congregate inside and then be disposed of in the morning.

Use a damp rolled up newspaper, corrugated cardboard or a short piece of hose and place on the soil near plants just before dark. Earwigs will congregate inside and then be disposed of in the morning.

Adult pear sawfly / pear slug (Hymenoptera) found on a rose leaf

Adult pear sawfly / pear slug (Hymenoptera) found on a rose leaf

The Demise of the Boxelder Bugs

The Demise of the Boxelder Bugs

Boxelder bugs aren't the most talked about pests but luckily, they can be easily gotten rid of. Here's one way to do it.

Keep your eyes peeled for these insects and spiders in your garden—they may be tiny but they’re doing big work.

Keep your eyes peeled for these insects and spiders in your garden—they may be tiny but they’re doing big work.

Ground beetle larva - formidable predators of mollusks and insects, includes maggots and maggot pupae, aphids (up to 50 a day!), caterpillars, slugs, snails, other beetles, grubs, cutworms... studied for their role in keeping down insect attacks in orchards, just as effective in vegetable gardens and flowerbeds. True, they sometimes prey on beneficial creatures (earthworms, ladybugs, etc.) and even cannibalistic, but much more beneficial than harmful.

Ground Beetles “Don’t Get No Respect”

Ground beetle larva - formidable predators of mollusks and insects, includes maggots and maggot pupae, aphids (up to 50 a day!), caterpillars, slugs, snails, other beetles, grubs, cutworms... studied for their role in keeping down insect attacks in orchards, just as effective in vegetable gardens and flowerbeds. True, they sometimes prey on beneficial creatures (earthworms, ladybugs, etc.) and even cannibalistic, but much more beneficial than harmful.

Assassin bug. This site has a lot of pics of beneficials for your garden. So don't squish 'em!

Assassin bug. This site has a lot of pics of beneficials for your garden. So don't squish 'em!

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