Explore Lewis Hine, Historical Photos, and more!

Explore related topics

Breaker boys working in Ewen Breaker. S. Pittston, Pa, January 1911 | by The U.S. National Archives  Lewis Hine was a New York City school teacher and social documentary photographer. In 1911, he was hired by the National Child Labor Committee to document child labor abuses in America. His heart-wrenching images of children at work helped lead to the passage of new labor laws in the United States.

Breaker Boys [Pennsylvania, This is a photograph of breaker boys – child labour used to separate coal from slate. This image helped lead the nation to outlaw child labour.

February 1912. Port Royal, South Carolina. "Bertha, one of the six-year old shuckers at Maggioni Canning Company. Began work at 4 a.m." Photograph and caption by Lewis Wickes Hine. "Back in the day almost everyone worked long hours, with little rest or diversion. It was considered normal. I'm glad most of our children now have the luxury of enjoying life. Some of them, though, could stand the discipline and rigor of a little more responsibility. Perhaps a little less than what is pictured…

February 1912 - Port Royal, South Carolina: Bertha, one of the six-year old shuckers at Maggioni Canning Company. She begins work at 4 a. Photograph (glass negative) by Lewis Wickes Hine.

Bean-Stringers: July 1909. Baltimore, Maryland. "Workers stringing beans in the J.S. Farrand Packing Co. Those too small to work are held on laps of workers or stowed away in boxes." Photograph and caption by Lewis Wickes Hine.

30 Shocking Photos Of Child Labor Between 1908 And Date: July 1909 Location: Baltimore, Maryland. Young workers stringing beans in the J. Farrand Packing Co. Those too small to work are held on laps of workers.

Newsboy Asleep on Stairs with Papers. Jersey City, NJ Feb 2012   By Lewis Hine detroit-aesthetic.tumblr.com

k-a-t-i-e-: “ Newsboy asleep on stairs with papers Jersey City, New Jersey, February, 1912 Lewis Hine ”

english-children-in-mill1-252x200.jpg 252×200 pixels

Children worked in inhumane conditions. Because of these conditions, nerve strain and eyestrain were common for young textile workers.

"In a South Carolina prison more than sixty-six years ago, guards walked a 14-year-old boy, bible tucked under his arm, to the electric chair. At 5' 1" and 95 pounds, the straps didn’t fit, and an electrode was too big for his leg.  The switch was pulled and the adult sized death mask fell from George Stinney’s face. Tears streamed from his eyes. Witnesses recoiled in horror as they watched the youngest person executed in the United States in the past century die.

It took 10 minutes to convict 14-year-old George Stinney Jr. It took 70 years after his execution to exonerate him.

South Carolina judge tosses conviction of black teen executed in George Stinney Jr appears in an undated police booking photo provided by the South Carolina Department of Archives and History

Night Shift: June 1911. Alexandria, Virginia. "Old Dominion Glass Co. A few of the young boys working on the night shift at the Alexandria glass factory....Photo by Lewis Wickes Hine.

"Old Dominion Glass Co. A few of the young boys working on the night shift at the Alexandria glass factory. Negroes work side by side with the white workers." Photograph by Lewis Wickes Hine

Noon, April 10, 1913. Cherokee Hosiery Mill in Rome, Georgia. The youngest are turners and loopers. Some of these appear to be as young as 8 and 9 years. Photograph and caption by Lewis Wickes Hine.

REMINDS ME OF NORTH & SOUTH TV SHOW! Noon, April Cherokee Hosiery Mill in Rome, Georgia. The youngest are turners and loopers. Some of these appear to be as young as 8 and 9 years. Photograph and caption by Lewis Wickes Hine.

Pinterest
Search