Explore Bus Boycott, Montgomery Alabama and more!

Google Image Result for http://blackhistorywall.files.wordpress.com/2010/02/picture-device- independent-bitmap-11.jpg - SHE WAS AFRICAN AMERICAN, CHEROKEE -CREET AND SCOTS-IRISH

Rosa Louise McCauley Parks was an African-American civil rights activist, whom the U. Congress called "the first lady of civil rights" and "the mother of the freedom movement". In June of she was presented with a Congressional Gold Medal.

We can do it!

People- Geraldine Hoff Doyle, was 17 years (in while she was working at the American Broach & Machine Co. when a photographer snapped a pic of her on the job. That image used by J. Howard Miller for the “We Can Do It!” poster, released during World War.

Young African American woman c.1900s

This is a portrait of a young African American woman. The photograph was taken in So many of the pictures of African Americans from t.

Sarah Rector--By the age of 10, she became the richest Black child in America. She received a land grant from the Creek Nation as part of reparations. Soon after, oil was discovered on her property. By 1912, the revenue from this oil was $371,000 per year (roughly $6.5 million today). Despite various attempts to steal her land and fortune, Sarah resisted. She went on to attend Tuskegee University and eventually settled in Kansas City, Missouri where her mansion still stands.

Birth Affidavit of Sarah Rector & Photo of Sarah as young girl Her name was Sarah Rector. She was a young black girl born in Indian Terri.

Vivien Thomas, African-American surgical technician who developed the procedures used to treat blue baby syndrome in the 1940s.  Thomas was also offered the position of Chief of Surgery at his alma mater, Johns Hopkins in 1941.

Vivien Thomas, cardiac surgery pioneer, He first developed the procedures used to treat blue baby syndrome

Claudette Colvin, first resister to bus segregation.

interesting-fact: Claudette Colvin resisted bus segregation nine months before Rosa Parks, and it is her case that went to the Supreme Court — only for her to be swept under the rug by NAACP leaders since she was a pregnant teenager.

Inspiring

Elizabeth Ann Grier, the first African-American woman licensed to practice medicine in Georgia. She was an emancipated slave who alternated every year of her medical education with a year of picking cotton in order to pay for her training.

On the day after Independence Day in 1852, Frederick Douglass delivered his famous speech, "What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?" in Rochester, New York.  He used the occasion to remark on the irony of celebrating American freedom and independence in the midst of the continued enslavement of African Americans.

Read one of the greatest speeches in American History. Frederick Douglass' What to the American Slave is Your of July. - What to the American Slave is Your Fourth of July?

Bessie Coleman - first female African American pilot. No American flight schools would take her, so she moved to France to train and live. She earned her living barnstorming and stunt flying.

Bessie Coleman: The first African-American woman pilot is highlighted in Kate Schatz's new book Rad American Women A-Z. In addition to this star aviator, Rad American Women features an awesome list of real-life women you can dress up as for Halloween.

Susie King Taylor: first African American army nurse; the  only African American woman to publish a memoir of her wartime experiences; also the first African American to teach openly in a school for former slaves in Georgia.

The 1st Black Nurse: Susie King Taylor

Susie King Taylor (August 1848 - October first African American army nurse; the only African American woman to publish a memoir of her wartime experiences; also the first African American to teach openly in a school for former slaves in Georgia.

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