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A bit like knighthoods or the word "devastating", The term "life's work" gets bandied about a bit casually for my liking. In this case, though, it is almost not big enough a term to describe just what Jimmy Nelson has been filling his time with. Travelling around the world armed with an enormous 4x5 camera (complete with a hood) he has trekked across dangerous lands in search for the world's least seen tribes.

A bit like knighthoods or the word "devastating", The term "life's work" gets bandied about a bit casually for my liking. In this case, though, it is almost not big enough a term to describe just what Jimmy Nelson has been filling his time with. Travelling around the world armed with an enormous 4x5 camera (complete with a hood) he has trekked across dangerous lands in search for the world's least seen tribes.

Maori tribes The long and intriguing story of the origine of the indigenous Maori people can be traced back to the 13th century, the mythical homeland Hawaiki, Eastern Polynesia. Due to centuries of isolation, the Maori established a distinct society with characteristic art, a separate language and unique mythology. “My language is my awakening, my language is the window to my soul”

Maori tribes The long and intriguing story of the origine of the indigenous Maori people can be traced back to the 13th century, the mythical homeland Hawaiki, Eastern Polynesia. Due to centuries of isolation, the Maori established a distinct society with characteristic art, a separate language and unique mythology. “My language is my awakening, my language is the window to my soul”

In Polynesian mythology (Tuamotus), Faumea is a Polynesian ocean goddess. Tangaroa and Faumea had two sons together: Tu-Nui-Ka-Rere and Turi-A-Faumea. Later, Turi-A-Faumea's wife Hina-Arau-Riki was kidnapped by the octopus-demon Rogo-Tumu-Here. Faumea helped Tangaroa and their sons rescue Hina by withdrawing the opposing winds into the sweat of her armpit and then releasing them to power the heroes' canoes.

Dying life of the tribe: Spectacular pictures by British photographer capture the people who are in danger of disappearing forever

In Polynesian mythology (Tuamotus), Faumea is a Polynesian ocean goddess. Tangaroa and Faumea had two sons together: Tu-Nui-Ka-Rere and Turi-A-Faumea. Later, Turi-A-Faumea's wife Hina-Arau-Riki was kidnapped by the octopus-demon Rogo-Tumu-Here. Faumea helped Tangaroa and their sons rescue Hina by withdrawing the opposing winds into the sweat of her armpit and then releasing them to power the heroes' canoes.

A bit like knighthoods or the word "devastating", The term "life's work" gets bandied about a bit casually for my liking. In this case, though, it is almost not big enough a term to describe just what Jimmy Nelson has been filling his time with. Travelling around the world armed with an enormous 4x5 camera (complete with a hood) he has trekked across dangerous lands in search for the world's least seen tribes.

A bit like knighthoods or the word "devastating", The term "life's work" gets bandied about a bit casually for my liking. In this case, though, it is almost not big enough a term to describe just what Jimmy Nelson has been filling his time with. Travelling around the world armed with an enormous 4x5 camera (complete with a hood) he has trekked across dangerous lands in search for the world's least seen tribes.

Reason for including it on my board-concept shoot styling

Through the lens: The world's dying tribal cultures

Reason for including it on my board-concept shoot styling

The Rabari women dedicate long hours to embroidery, a vital and evolving expression of their crafted textile tradition. They also manage the hamlets and all money matters while the men are on the move with the herds. The livestock, wool, milk and leather, is their main source of income.

The Rabari women dedicate long hours to embroidery, a vital and evolving expression of their crafted textile tradition. They also manage the hamlets and all money matters while the men are on the move with the herds. The livestock, wool, milk and leather, is their main source of income.

The photographer Jimmy Nelson visited 31 secluded and visually unique tribes around the world. The result is huge — in extend and significance.

The photographer Jimmy Nelson visited 31 secluded and visually unique tribes around the world. The result is huge — in extend and significance.

Before Masai Pass Away - by Jimmy Nelson

Before They Pass Away: A tribute to vibrant tribal cultures around the world

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