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Edmonia Lewis (ca. July 4, 1844–September 17, 1907) was an African/Native American sculptor (African, Ojibwe and Haitian) who worked for most of her career in Rome. Her heritage is African-American and Native American and she gained fame and recognition as a sculptor in the international fine arts world.

Edmonia Lewis (ca. July 4, 1844–September 17, 1907) was an African/Native American sculptor (African, Ojibwe and Haitian) who worked for most of her career in Rome. Her heritage is African-American and Native American and she gained fame and recognition as a sculptor in the international fine arts world.

How did she die so young?? Only 35 or 36 years old. - "Dr. Georgia E.L. Patton (1864-1900), Memphis,Tn: Ex- Slave & The First Licensed Black Woman Doctor in the state of Tennessee."

How did she die so young?? Only 35 or 36 years old. - "Dr. Georgia E.L. Patton (1864-1900), Memphis,Tn: Ex- Slave & The First Licensed Black Woman Doctor in the state of Tennessee."

"Cudjoe" is believed to be the last slave born in Africa and brought to the United States by the transatlantic slave trade. Before he died, he gave several interviews on his experiences, including one to the writer Zora Neale Hurston. During that interview in 1928, Hurston made a short film of Cudjoe, the only moving image that exists in the Western hemisphere of an African transported through the transatlantic slave trade.

"Cudjoe" is believed to be the last slave born in Africa and brought to the United States by the transatlantic slave trade. Before he died, he gave several interviews on his experiences, including one to the writer Zora Neale Hurston. During that interview in 1928, Hurston made a short film of Cudjoe, the only moving image that exists in the Western hemisphere of an African transported through the transatlantic slave trade.

Stunning Unseen Studio Portraits Of Black People In Victorian Britain

Stunning Unseen Studio Portraits Of Black People In Victorian Britain

Member of the African choir The African Choir were a group of young South African singers that toured Britain between 1891 and They were formed to raise funds for a Christian school in their home country and performed for Queen Victoria at Osborne House,

Millie and Christine McCoy (1851-1912) were conjoined twins born into slavery.  They and their mother were sold to a showman, Joseph Smith.  Smith and his wife educated the girls; they eventually could speak five languages, dance, play music, and sing.  They were known as 'The Two Headed Nightingale'.  In the 1880s they retired and purchased a small farm.  Millie died of tuberculosis at age 61, with Christine following hours later.  They remain one of the oldest-lived set of conjoined twins.

Millie and Christine McCoy (1851-1912) were conjoined twins born into slavery. They and their mother were sold to a showman, Joseph Smith. Smith and his wife educated the girls; they eventually could speak five languages, dance, play music, and sing. They were known as 'The Two Headed Nightingale'. In the 1880s they retired and purchased a small farm. Millie died of tuberculosis at age 61, with Christine following hours later. They remain one of the oldest-lived set of conjoined twins.

Willa Brown Chappell , born in 1906 . In 1938 , she became the first woman Black pilot licensed in the united states and in 1943 , the first African American Woman to possess a commercial pilot and mechanic's licence

Electronic Field Trip to the Aviation Museum of Kentucky

Willa Brown Chappell , born in 1906 . In 1938 , she became the first woman Black pilot licensed in the united states and in 1943 , the first African American Woman to possess a commercial pilot and mechanic's licence

"I have borne 13 children, and seen most sold off to slavery. And when I cried out with a mother's grief, none heard me but Jesus!" quote from "Ain't I A Woman?" by Sojourner Truth

"I have borne 13 children, and seen most sold off to slavery. And when I cried out with a mother's grief, none heard me but Jesus!" quote from "Ain't I A Woman?" by Sojourner Truth

Betsey Stockton (c. 1798–1865) was an African American educator and missionary born into slavery in Princeton, NJ. She gained her freedom at 20 and travelled to Hawaii, Canada and Philadelphia teaching and serving as a nurse. She moved back to Princeton in 1835 and spent the rest of her life enriching the lives of the members of the local African American community. There is a window memorialized to her in the Witherspoon Street Church, Princeton, NJ.

Betsey Stockton (c. 1798–1865) was an African American educator and missionary born into slavery in Princeton, NJ. She gained her freedom at 20 and travelled to Hawaii, Canada and Philadelphia teaching and serving as a nurse. She moved back to Princeton in 1835 and spent the rest of her life enriching the lives of the members of the local African American community. There is a window memorialized to her in the Witherspoon Street Church, Princeton, NJ.

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