Benjy Frances Brooks was the first woman to become a pediatric surgeon in the state of Texas. In her work at Texas Children's Hospital and St. Joseph's Hospital in Houston, she conducted research on congenital defects, burn treatment, spleen reparation, and the prevention of hepatitis.

Benjy Frances Brooks was the first woman to become a pediatric surgeon in the state of Texas. In her work at Texas Children's Hospital and St. Joseph's Hospital in Houston, she conducted research on congenital defects, burn treatment, spleen reparation, and the prevention of hepatitis.

Ruth Harriet Bleier was a renowned neurophysiologist who was among the first American scholars to examine gender bias in the modern biological sciences from a feminist perspective. Throughout her career she combined her interests in scientific and academic work with a commitment to social justice and activism.

Ruth Harriet Bleier was a renowned neurophysiologist who was among the first American scholars to examine gender bias in the modern biological sciences from a feminist perspective. Throughout her career she combined her interests in scientific and academic work with a commitment to social justice and activism.

Georgeanna Seegar Jones, M.D., has spent a lifetime breaking through the "glass ceiling" of medical research and making a mark in reproductive medicine and endocrinology. While still a medical student at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Dr. Jones completed her groundbreaking research, which showed that the pregnancy hormone (now called chorionic gonadotropin) arose from the placenta rather than from the pituitary, as was previously believed.

Georgeanna Seegar Jones, M.D., has spent a lifetime breaking through the "glass ceiling" of medical research and making a mark in reproductive medicine and endocrinology. While still a medical student at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Dr. Jones completed her groundbreaking research, which showed that the pregnancy hormone (now called chorionic gonadotropin) arose from the placenta rather than from the pituitary, as was previously believed.

Dr. Mary Dixon Jones became a world-renowned surgeon for her treatment of diseases of the female reproductive system, in a time when few women physicians were able to build a career in the specialty.

Dr. Mary Dixon Jones became a world-renowned surgeon for her treatment of diseases of the female reproductive system, in a time when few women physicians were able to build a career in the specialty.

Gisella Perl,a successful Jewish gynaecologist in Romania in the 1930s and 40s.She was taken to Auschwitz in 1944,where she treated women with kindness and compassion.She was asked to report all pregnant women to Josef Mengele- better known as the Angel of Death.When she discovered what was done to them (medical experimentation and torture,ending with often being thrown alive into the crematoriums)she vowed that there would never again be a pregnant woman in Aschwitz.So she began the…

Gisella Perl,a successful Jewish gynaecologist in Romania in the 1930s and 40s.She was taken to Auschwitz in 1944,where she treated women with kindness and compassion.She was asked to report all pregnant women to Josef Mengele- better known as the Angel of Death.When she discovered what was done to them (medical experimentation and torture,ending with often being thrown alive into the crematoriums)she vowed that there would never again be a pregnant woman in Aschwitz.So she began the…

Dr. Jean L. Fourcroy postponed studying medicine to support her husband's career and raise a family. She was 42 years old and the mother of four teenagers when she began training as a physician in 1972, and has gone on to become a leading advocate for women in medicine and a nationally-recognized scientist and surgeon.

Dr. Jean L. Fourcroy postponed studying medicine to support her husband's career and raise a family. She was 42 years old and the mother of four teenagers when she began training as a physician in 1972, and has gone on to become a leading advocate for women in medicine and a nationally-recognized scientist and surgeon.

Dr. Audrey Evans - Cancer researcher who helped start Ronald McDonald houses and who relates to patients as people, not just as "cases."  Researcher and physician extraordinaire.

Dr. Audrey Evans - Cancer researcher who helped start Ronald McDonald houses and who relates to patients as people, not just as "cases." Researcher and physician extraordinaire.

Muriel Petioni, M. D., was dubbed the "matron of Harlem health." Petioni's response? "Yup...They call me a legend." She was an energetic, mischievous pioneer and a self-proclaimed "meddler." In 2002, at age 88, she was still spending almost every day at Harlem Hospital Center, advocating for unhappy patients, and even watching for maintenance problems.

Muriel Petioni, M. D., was dubbed the "matron of Harlem health." Petioni's response? "Yup...They call me a legend." She was an energetic, mischievous pioneer and a self-proclaimed "meddler." In 2002, at age 88, she was still spending almost every day at Harlem Hospital Center, advocating for unhappy patients, and even watching for maintenance problems.

Louise Pearce, M.D., a physician and pathologist, was one of the foremost women scientists of the early 20th century. Her research with pathologist Wade Hampton Brown led to a cure for trypanosomiasis (African Sleeping sickness) in 1919

Louise Pearce, M.D., a physician and pathologist, was one of the foremost women scientists of the early 20th century. Her research with pathologist Wade Hampton Brown led to a cure for trypanosomiasis (African Sleeping sickness) in 1919

Pediatric ophthalmologist Terri L. Young, M.D., researches the molecular genetics of myopia to help find better treatments for eye disorders. Since 2001, she has been associate professor of ophthalmology and pediatrics at the University of Pennsylvania and director of the Ophthalmic Genetics Research Center of the Children's Hospital of Pennsylvania.

Pediatric ophthalmologist Terri L. Young, M.D., researches the molecular genetics of myopia to help find better treatments for eye disorders. Since 2001, she has been associate professor of ophthalmology and pediatrics at the University of Pennsylvania and director of the Ophthalmic Genetics Research Center of the Children's Hospital of Pennsylvania.

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