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A humpback #whale emerges from the water off the Antarctic Peninsula. [Photo credit: Ari Friedlaender, NSF]

A humpback #whale emerges from the water off the Antarctic Peninsula. [Photo credit: Ari Friedlaender, NSF]

An emperor #penguin dives into the frigid Antarctic water. Emperors can dive as deep as 1,800 feet (550 meters) on a single breath of air that can last up to 20 minutes. Emperor penguin studies is just one example of the many research projects supported by the NSF's U.S. Antarctic Program.  [Photo credit: Glenn Grant, NSF]

An emperor #penguin dives into the frigid Antarctic water. Emperors can dive as deep as 1,800 feet (550 meters) on a single breath of air that can last up to 20 minutes. Emperor penguin studies is just one example of the many research projects supported by the NSF's U.S. Antarctic Program. [Photo credit: Glenn Grant, NSF]

A group of Adelie #penguins swim along the water by porpoising in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica. [Photo credit: Peter Rejcek, NSF]

A group of Adelie #penguins swim along the water by porpoising in McMurdo Sound, Antarctica. [Photo credit: Peter Rejcek, NSF]

The high intertidal lined shore (Pachygrapsus crassipes) crab. Most #crabs will consume anything and thus act to clean up the tidepools. This is just one of the thousands of species of marine plants and animals found in the small bodies of water left by the ebbing tide that fill the rock basins and depressions along #California's rocky shores. [Photo credit: Genny Anderson, Santa Barbara City College]

The high intertidal lined shore (Pachygrapsus crassipes) crab. Most #crabs will consume anything and thus act to clean up the tidepools. This is just one of the thousands of species of marine plants and animals found in the small bodies of water left by the ebbing tide that fill the rock basins and depressions along #California's rocky shores. [Photo credit: Genny Anderson, Santa Barbara City College]

Two fur seals enjoy the sun while resting on rocks at Dream Island, located near Palmer Station, #Antarctica. [Photo credit: Madison McConnell, NSF]

Two fur seals enjoy the sun while resting on rocks at Dream Island, located near Palmer Station, #Antarctica. [Photo credit: Madison McConnell, NSF]

Giant barrel sponges off Little Cayman Island. With coral cover on Caribbean reefs at historic lows, sponges are now the dominant, habitat-forming animals on most of them. [Photo credit: Joseph R. Pawlik, University of North Carolina Wilmington]

Giant barrel sponges off Little Cayman Island. With coral cover on Caribbean reefs at historic lows, sponges are now the dominant, habitat-forming animals on most of them. [Photo credit: Joseph R. Pawlik, University of North Carolina Wilmington]

The bright blue and green colors in this #satellite image show the North Atlantic Bloom, a massive swath of phytoplankton that unfolds each spring in the North Atlantic Ocean. [Photo credit: NASA]

The bright blue and green colors in this #satellite image show the North Atlantic Bloom, a massive swath of phytoplankton that unfolds each spring in the North Atlantic Ocean. [Photo credit: NASA]

You will need clean dry paper clips tissue paper a bowl of water pencil with eraser What to do Fill the bowl with water Try to make the paper clip float…not much luck, huh? Tear a piece of tissue paper about half the size of a dollar bill GENTLY drop the tissue flat onto the …

You will need clean dry paper clips tissue paper a bowl of water pencil with eraser What to do Fill the bowl with water Try to make the paper clip float…not much luck, huh? Tear a piece of tissue paper about half the size of a dollar bill GENTLY drop the tissue flat onto the …

More than five different species of sponges cover a #coral head on a reef in the #Bahamas. #NSFfunded research suggests that a decrease of predator fish, which feed on sponges, due to overfishing greatly impacts coral reefs in the Caribbean. [Photo credit: Joe Pawlik, University of North Carolina Wilmington]

More than five different species of sponges cover a #coral head on a reef in the #Bahamas. #NSFfunded research suggests that a decrease of predator fish, which feed on sponges, due to overfishing greatly impacts coral reefs in the Caribbean. [Photo credit: Joe Pawlik, University of North Carolina Wilmington]

Palau's coral reefs are surprisingly resistant to ocean acidification. [credit: Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute]

Palau's coral reefs are surprisingly resistant to ocean acidification. [credit: Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute]

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