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The Spitfire was a low-wing monoplane that was first flown in 1936 and was first put into service with the Royal Air Force in 1938. It was modified continuously throughout the war to serve in a variety of roles: fighter (with notable success at high altitudes), fighter-bomber, and photo reconnaissance plane.

The last of the few...New book captures the last Spitfires in stunning air to air action. Soaring into the skies above the green and pleasant land they so spectacularly fought to defend 76 years ago, they are the last of the few airworthy Spitfires left.

from Mail Online

Last hurrah for the Harrier: Jump jets take to the skies for their final farewell

Able bodied: The unusual vertical take-off and landing abilities enabled Harrier jump jets to fly in and out of areas near to the battlefield although the weight of fuel required for vertical take-off limited its weapon load. Four GR9 Harriers, flying in formation over Britain. Nearest to the camera is a GR9 in the tail colours of 800 Naval Squadron, then 4 Squadron, 1 Squadron, the furthest GR9 is painted in the 1969 camouflage pattern

Black Buck Buddies by Ivan Berryman - It is ironic that, just as the RAF were beginning to retire or re-assign their ageing force of V-bombers, the situation in the Falkland Islands called for a long-distance bombing mission to disable the runway at Port Stanley which now threatened to become an operational fighter base for the Argentine Air Force. Flying a round trip of some 8,000 miles, it was necessary for Avro Vulcan XM607 to refuel several times from a fleet of Victor tankers who…

from Mail Online

Pioneering female pilot who flew Spitfires during Second World War and became magazine cover girl dies aged 91

Maureen Dunlop de Popp, a female pilot who flew Spitfires, Lancasters and Hurricanes during the Second World War, has died aged 91. Dunlop joined the Air Transport Auxiliary (ATA) in 1942 and became one of a small group of female pilots based at White Waltham in Berkshire who were trained to fly 38 types of aircraft between factories and military airfields across the country.