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If you want to understand function, study structure - but does it float

If you want to understand function, study structure — but does it float

The drawn outline of a body and the chart (astronomical) as a littoral territory .

I am the daughter of Earth and Water, And the nursling of the Sky; I pass through the pores of the ocean and shores; I change, but I cannot die

New York-based artist Kim Keever photographs colorful liquids blending together into captivating, abstract forms.

If you want to understand function, study structure - but does it float

If you want to understand function, study structure - but does it float

Jiří Kolář (collage)

by the great Jiri Kolar

"Luminesce" (Original Art from David Lidbetter)

Muse Gallery Toronto - painter: David Lidbetter "Luminesce" - Oil on wood pane

notice how many ways simply paying attention attracts what you are looking for.

5 ways to feed your creative soul this weekend, via Christina Rosalie

Japanese-born, New York-based artist Katsumi Hayakawa constructs densely layered sculptures that resemble, rather than replicate, overbuilt cityscapes.    Hayakawa erects boxes of varying heights along a grid, leaving voids in the volumes that create another level of complexity. Instead of reading as individual buildings, the structures form an abstract composition.

Katsumi Hayakawa Carves Sprawling Cityscapes Out Of Paper

Japanese-born, New York-based artist Katsumi Hayakawa constructs densely layered sculptures that resemble, rather than replicate, overbuilt cityscapes. Hayakawa erects boxes of varying heights along a grid, leaving voids in the volumes.

Fallen city by Erol Akyavas $650.000

Fallen city by Erol Akyavas $650.000

No self is of itself alone  Collages by Val Britton  Title: Erwin Schrödinger

Val Britton "double I" 2011 monoprint, ink, acrylic, watercolor, and latex paint on paper 26 x 40 in

- by genadii berёzkin, via Flickr

- by genadii berёzkin, via Flickr

Asteroides

nasasapod: “ Asteroids in the Distance Image Credit: R. Evans & K. Stapelfeldt (JPL), HST, NASA Explanation: Rocks from space hit Earth every day. The larger the rock, though, the less often.

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