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Microscopic plant cells

Memory can be aided through beauty because it stimulates and encourages memory. 'Beauty in nature: microscopic plant cells' emphasises Patterns, texture, colour and can even evoke pattern inspiration.

Magnified Plant cells. Similar to the pattern of a spider web, small squares are created from a linear pattern. I like the bold contrasting outline of the boxes against the lighter coloured background. It's a mix of a random pattern and a regular repeating pattern which I think makes this particularly interesting.

Microscopic Photograph stained cross-sections of plants, revealing patterns of plant cell growth

Fan Coral

Gorgonian Sea Fan ~ as seen in 2014 Nature Design slimline wall calendar…

Cross-section of a sugarcane root | Debora Leite || A dicot plant as seen through the lack of vascular bundles, or "Monkey faces".

Cross-section of a sugarcane root. A dicot plant as seen through the lack of vascular bundles, or "Monkey faces".

Fragile Beauty - dragonfly wing close up - delicate nature; natural surface pattern inspiration

Fragile Beauty - dragonfly wing close up - delicate nature; natural surface pattern inspiration, beauty and photography, nature, schoonheid en natuur

Vascular bundle of a Fern Rhizome. Microscopic cross-section of xylem and phloem cells by Michael Clayton.

This isn't lace, it's the vascular bundle of a Fern Rhizome. Microscopic cross-section of xylem and phloem cells (water and sap-carrying cells) by Michael Clayton.

Diatom. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of the surface of the mineralised cell wall (frustule) of an unidentified diatom. This i...

Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of the surface of the mineralised cell wall (frustule) of an unidentified diatom from Science Photo Library.

this is the surface of a mosquito egg- wow, who would think of looking this closely!

The image shows the surface of a mosquito egg (from Culex pipiens), which generates a water repellent network by connecting microscopically small structures to trap a thin layer of air. (Credit: Martin Oeggerli, The EMBO Journal)

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