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George Scharf: From Regency Street to the Modern Metropolis, London - A lane near St Martin's Church c1828

George Scharf: From Regency Street to the Modern Metropolis, London - A lane near St Martin's Church c1828

paul-stewart-1830-old-british-museum-montagu-house.jpg 473×355 pixels

paul-stewart-1830-old-british-museum-montagu-house.jpg 473×355 pixels

Royal College of Surgeons and Physicians

Royal College of Surgeons and Physicians

Pollard, Gloucester Coffee House, Piccadilly, 1828  As I said at the beginning, this image is fraught with meaning. I wonder if, when he was sketching this scene,  Scharf knew he was recording the great coaching era at its peak. Mail coaches leaving London     George Scharf: Chronicler of 19th Century London

Pollard, Gloucester Coffee House, Piccadilly, 1828 As I said at the beginning, this image is fraught with meaning. I wonder if, when he was sketching this scene, Scharf knew he was recording the great coaching era at its peak. Mail coaches leaving London George Scharf: Chronicler of 19th Century London

EKDuncan - My Fanciful Muse: Regency England - London Street Views - Ackermann's Repository

EKDuncan - My Fanciful Muse: Regency England - London Street Views - Ackermann's Repository

Today, Oxford Street is a thoroughfare in the West End of London, but its origins go far back to the Roman roads. Between the 12th century and the year of my story, To Tame the Wind, 1782, it was variously known as Tyburn Road, Uxbridge Road, Worcester Road and Oxford Road. It became notorious as the route taken by prisoners on their final journey from Newgate Prison to the gallows at Tyburn near Marble Arch. Beginning about 1729, however, it became known as Oxford Street.

Today, Oxford Street is a thoroughfare in the West End of London, but its origins go far back to the Roman roads. Between the 12th century and the year of my story, To Tame the Wind, 1782, it was variously known as Tyburn Road, Uxbridge Road, Worcester Road and Oxford Road. It became notorious as the route taken by prisoners on their final journey from Newgate Prison to the gallows at Tyburn near Marble Arch. Beginning about 1729, however, it became known as Oxford Street.

3272512-9th-march-1822-two-regency-gentlemen-taking-a-gettyimages.jpg 1,024×668 pixels

3272512-9th-march-1822-two-regency-gentlemen-taking-a-gettyimages.jpg 1,024×668 pixels

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