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Chief Tabananika - Chief of the Yamparika Comanche. Sometimes spelled as Tabananica, his name translates to "Sound of the Sun" or "Hears the Sunrise." General L. S. Ross, in the book "Indian Depredations," by J. W. Wilbarger identified Tabananika as the Chief in charge of the Comanches at the Battle of the Pease river in 1860. In 1865, he was one of the signers of the treaty at the Little Arkansas River.

Chief Tabananika - Chief of the Yamparika Comanche. Sometimes spelled as Tabananica, his name translates to "Sound of the Sun" or "Hears the Sunrise." General L. S. Ross, in the book "Indian Depredations," by J. W. Wilbarger identified Tabananika as the Chief in charge of the Comanches at the Battle of the Pease river in 1860. In 1865, he was one of the signers of the treaty at the Little Arkansas River.

The Fort Parker massacre was an event in May 1836 in which members of the pioneer Parker family were killed in a raid by Native Americans. In this raid, a 9-year old girl, Cynthia Ann Parker, was captured and spent most of the rest of her life with the Comanche, marrying a Chief, Peta Nocona. Her brother, John Richard Parker, who was also captured, was ransomed back after six years, but unable to adapt to white society, ran back to the Comanches.

Rachel Parker Plummer was a cousin to Cynthia Ann Parker. She and her husband and infant son James Pratt lived in Fort Parker along wi.

Quanah (aka Fragrance, aka Quanah Parker), the son of Tahconneahpeah (aka Peta Nocona) and Nadua (aka Someone Found, aka Cynthia Ann Parker) - Comanche/EuroAmerican - before his death in 1911

Quanah (aka Fragrance, aka Quanah Parker), the son of Tahconneahpeah (aka Peta Nocona) and Nadua (aka Someone Found, aka Cynthia Ann Parker) - Comanche/EuroAmerican - before his death in 1911

Quanah Parker was the last Chief of the Commanches and never lost a battle to the white man. His tribe roamed over the area where Pampas stands. He was never captured by the Army, but decided to

Quanah Parker, the Comanche Chief who resisted the settlement of White cattle ranchers in Texas. sits atop his horse next to his wife, To-Nicy

Chief Quanah Parker.  Comanche. Lawton, Oklahoma. 1904-1918

The people had made their peace with the land, climate and Indian reservations. It became in interesting mix of living a hard life on the land.

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