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Esarhaddon Inscription. This basalt block describes the restoration of Babylon in 670 BC. by the Assyrian king Esarhaddon (681-669 BC). It is interesting that it was Nabopolassar of Babylon who later destroyed Assyria.

A brick from the Tower of Babel, c. 604-562 BC. In Neo Babylonian, 7 lines in cuneiform script blindprinted into the wet clay, within a lined rectangle, prior to baking. Part of the inscription says: “Nebuchadnezzar, King of Babylon, Guardian of the Temples Esagila and Ezida, Firstborn Son of Nabopolassar, King of Babylon.”

Cuneiform tablet: Sumerian dedicatory(?) inscription from Ekur, the temple of the god Enlil, Kassite, ca. 16th-15th century BCE, black marble, Mesopotamia, probably from Nippur. The Kassites were an ancient Near Eastern people who controlled Babylonia after the fall of the Old Babylonian Empire ca. 1531 BC and until ca. 1155 BC

Stele of the protective goddess Lama, Lassite, ca. 1307-1282 BCE. The Kassites were an ancient Near Eastern people who controlled Babylonia after the fall of the Old Babylonian Empire ca. 1531 BC and until ca. 1155 BC

Sennacherib, Nineveh, Iraq. Some say that Sennacherib, not Nebuchadnezzar, has been proven to be the king who built the Hanging Gardens at Nineveh, not Babylon.

This ceramic brick is inscribed in cuneiform with the name of Nebuchadnezzar II, who is mentioned some 90 times in the Bible (e.g. Ezra 1:7). Ancient kings often used inscribed bricks in their building projects. This one was originally made in c. 604-562 BC and was found in the ruins of ancient Babylon during excavations in 1927. It reads, "Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon, Guardian of the temples of Esagila and Ezida, Firstborn son of Nabopolasser, king of Babylon."

Neo-Babylonian cuneiform foundation brick, reign of Nebuchadnezzar II, 604-561 B.C. The inscription on this brick translates: ‘Nebuchadnezzar, king of Babylon, who cares for Esagila and Ezida, eldest son of Nabopolassar, king of Babylon’, on back sign of saw, 21,5x15x2,5 cm Private collection, from Artemission gallery From more info about this type https://web.stanford.edu/group/chr/cgi-bin/drupal/files/Market%20in%20Iraqi%20antiquities%20(2008)%20txt.pdf

10 August 12 BCE, the Neo-Assyrian Empire ended when the city of Nineveh on the river Tigris fell to a coalition of various Indo-Iranian tribes under the Babylonian King Nabopolassar. Depicted below is the imagination of the English Romantic painter John Martin of the Fall of Nineveh from 1828, who was quite fascinated with the burning and destruction of ancient sites anyway.

ca. 2700–2000 BCE. Gold Jug. The Hatti founded Hattusa in ancient Turkey before the Hittites. Hatti made exceptional metal objects. Burial goods.

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