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RANGERS: Early Texas Rangers Perhaps the most storied lawmen of the West were the Texas Rangers. Comanches, not outlaws, were the principle adversaries of the Rangers in the years immediately following the Civil War. Photos of Texas Rangers taken prior to 1870 are rare. This one of James Thomas Bird (left) and John J. Haynes was taken in 1868 and shows the young Indian fighters outfitted more like Civil War guerrillas than the later Texas cowboys.

TEXAS RANGERS — (Standing from left) Jim King, Bass Outlaw, Riley Boston, Charley Fusselman, Tink Durbin, Ernest Rogers, Charles Barton and Walter Jones. (Seated, from left) Bob Bell, Cal Aten, Captain Frank Jones, J. Walter Durbin, Jim Robinson and Frank L. Schmid. – Courtesy Texas Ranger Research Center; Texas Ranger Hall of Fame & Museum —

Geronimo (Apache), Quanah Parker (Comanche/Scots-Irish) - 1905

A powerful story of overcoming obstacles…

Extremely rare CDV of Will Bill Hickok photographed a year before his death by D.D. Dare in Cheyenne, Wyoming.

Dallas Stoudenmire - perhaps the most deadly of all gunfighters; former Texas Ranger and U.S. Marshall; wore two guns and was accurate with either or both hands. A tall (6' 4"), dark and handsome ladies man, he was also a quick-tempered killer when drunk. A dangerous man with a well-earned reputation as a gunfighter and tamer of lawless towns. He died as he lived.

When you need to get the real story about some of history's most fascinating women, call Stacy Schiff. The Pulitzer Prize-winning author's work includes Véra (Mrs. Vladimir Nabokov) and Cleopatra: A Life. In her highly anticipated new book, The Witches: Salem, 1692, Schiff focuses on an infamous and dark period of American history, especially as it relates to women: the Salem witch trials.

from Mail Online

The real-life Django: black Wild West marshal Bass Reeves who arrested 3,000 outlaws and killed 14 men

The real-life Django: The legendary African-American Wild West marshal who arrested 3,000 outlaws and killed 14 men Bass Reeves was born a slave in 1838 and later broke from his owner to live among Native Americans Reeves became a Deputy U.S. Marshal in 1875 at the age of 38 During his 32-year career as a Deputy Marshal he arrested 3,000 felons, killed 14 men and was never shot