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The most important ship in the history of New Zealand and Australia is Captain James Cook's 106 ft (32 metres) long barque Endeavour.

The most important ship in the history of New Zealand and Australia is Captain James Cook's 106 ft metres) long barque Endeavour.

VERIFIED:,Location: Cape Palliser Lighthouse (C Palliser named by Cpt. Cook after one of his R Navy mates) , South Wairarapa, at the very Southern tip of the North Island, and 50kms East of the entrance to Wellington Harbour. Built in 1897, it plays a vital part in the safe navigation of Cook Strait, between New Zealand's North and South Islands. . The Cape Palliser Lighthouse is an unmanned lighthouse blinking once every 20 seconds. It is also home to a permanent fur seal colony. Cape…

Historic Cape Palliser Lighthouse Wairarapa North Island New Zealand Canvas Art - David Wall DanitaDelimont x

Pointe Venus Lighthouse - In 1769, James Cook and his fellow astronomers planned a quick jaunt from England to observe the century's second transit of Venus. They may have miscalculated observation time. The team did not return to England until 1771. #GummyDrop #Tahiti

Pointe Venus Lighthouse - In James Cook and his fellow astronomers planned a quick jaunt from England to observe the century's second transit of Venus. They may have miscalculated observation time. The team did not return to England until

Lighthouse Road - James Cook Apartments Holiday Apartment Byron Bay

Book Northern Rivers and Byron Bay accommodation with Stayz, home to over holiday houses Australia-wide.

Lighthouse Rd - James Cook Apartments Holiday Apartment, Byron Bay Accommodation

Lighthouse Rd - James Cook Apartments Holiday Apartment, Byron Bay Accommodation

James Cook

British explorer James Cook's legendary HMS Endeavour, lost at sea centuries ago, may have been discovered off the coast of Rhode Island by a research team.

The 30m majestic tower of Eddystone Rock standing proud in the turbulent waters off of South East Cape.  The Rock, known for its inaccessibility and distinct shape, was named by Captain James Cook in 1777 because he thought it resembled Eddystone Lighthouse in Devon, England.

The 30m majestic tower of Eddystone Rock standing proud in the turbulent waters off of South East Cape. The Rock, known for its inaccessibility and distinct shape, was named by Captain James Cook in 1777 because he thought it resembled Eddystone Lighthouse in Devon, England.

There are several good walks at Castlepoint including the boardwalk to the lighthouse, which has been operational since 1913. For a longer hike, follow the track through Castlepoint Scenic Reserve to Castle Rock, an impressive rock formation that was named by Captain James Cook in 1770.

Waiararapa Attractions Walk to the Castlepoint lighthouse for panoramic views of the Wairarapa coast.

Cape Palliser Lighthouse, South Wairarapa, at the very Southern tip of the North Island, and 50kms East of the entrance to Wellington Harbour. Built in 1829, it plays a vital part in the safe navigation of Cook Strait, between New Zealand's North and South Islands. The Cape Palliser Lighthouse is an unmanned lighthouse blinking once every 20 seconds. Cape Palliser was named by Captain James Cook in honour of 'his worthy friend' Admiral Sir Hugh Palliser of the British Royal Navy.

Cape Palliser Lighthouse, South Wairarapa, at the very Southern tip of the North Island, and 50kms East of the entrance to Wellington Harbour. Built in 1829, it plays a vital part in the safe navigation of Cook Strait, between New Zealand's North and South Islands. The Cape Palliser Lighthouse is an unmanned lighthouse blinking once every 20 seconds. Cape Palliser was named by Captain James Cook in honour of 'his worthy friend' Admiral Sir Hugh Palliser of the British Royal Navy.

Cape Palliser was named by Captain James Cook, on December 7, 1769 while sailing up the coast he sighted land and named the point Cape Palliser after his good friend Captain Palliser of the Beagle.

Cape Palliser was named by Captain James Cook, on December 1769 while sailing up the coast he sighted land and named the point Cape Palliser after his good friend Captain Palliser of the Beagle.

A rare ceremonial yew-wood club given to Captain James Cook by the Nuu-chah-nulth people of Vancouver Island in 1778 during his third and final voyage has returned to Canada for good. The artifact, a club in the shape of an arm and hand holding a sphere, was carved with stone tools or possibly mussel shells years before it was given to Captain Cook, probably around the mid-1700s. It is the oldest known club of its kind, and it’s the most finely executed.

Rare ceremonial club from the Nuu-chah-nulth people of Vancouver Island’s west coast, received by Captain Cook in Donated to Museum of Anthropology, University of British Columbia

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