Ālī Qāpū (Persian: عالی‌قاپو, from Ottoman Turkish Âli Qapı - "High Porte") is a grand palace in Isfahan, Iran. It is located on the western side of the Naqsh-e Jahan Square opposite to Sheikh Lotf allah mosque, and had been originally designed as a vast portal. It is forty-eight meters high and there are seven floors, each accessible by a difficult spiral staircase. In the sixth floor music room, deep circular niches are found in the walls, having not only aesthetic value, but also…

Ālī Qāpū (Persian: عالی‌قاپو, from Ottoman Turkish Âli Qapı - "High Porte") is a grand palace in Isfahan, Iran. It is located on the western side of the Naqsh-e Jahan Square opposite to Sheikh Lotf allah mosque, and had been originally designed as a vast portal. It is forty-eight meters high and there are seven floors, each accessible by a difficult spiral staircase. In the sixth floor music room, deep circular niches are found in the walls, having not only aesthetic value, but also…

Vank Cathedral was one of the first churches to be established in the city of New Jolfa, Iran, district by Armenian immigrants settled by Shah Abbas I after the Ottoman War of 1603-1605.

Vank Cathedral was one of the first churches to be established in the city of New Jolfa, Iran, district by Armenian immigrants settled by Shah Abbas I after the Ottoman War of 1603-1605.

Inspirational Patterns that can be interpreted by #SICIS The Art Mosaic Factory and be created into a custom #mosaic

Inspirational Patterns that can be interpreted by #SICIS The Art Mosaic Factory and be created into a custom #mosaic

Isfahan Mosque: Located in Isfahan, 340 km south of Tehran, the Friday mosque of Isfahan is a prominent architectural expression of the Seljuk rule in Persia (1038-1118). In 1051, Isfahan became the capital of the Seljuks, who arrived in Khwarazm and Transoxiana from central Asia in the eleventh century. Defenders of Sunnism, they aimed at the restoration of the Abbasid Caliphate.

Isfahan Mosque: Located in Isfahan, 340 km south of Tehran, the Friday mosque of Isfahan is a prominent architectural expression of the Seljuk rule in Persia (1038-1118). In 1051, Isfahan became the capital of the Seljuks, who arrived in Khwarazm and Transoxiana from central Asia in the eleventh century. Defenders of Sunnism, they aimed at the restoration of the Abbasid Caliphate.

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