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the #smallcraft collection at #calvertmarinemuseum #southernmaryland #boats #exhibits

the #smallcraft collection at #calvertmarinemuseum #southernmaryland #boats #exhibits

The Edna E. Lockwood is a Chesapeake Bay bugeye, the last working oyster boat of her kind. She is now at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in Saint Michaels, MD.  She was built in 1889 at Tilghman Island, MD by John B. Harrison and is of nine-log construction, similar to the smaller log canoe, and was launched on Oct. 5, 1889 for Daniel Haddaway, at a cost of $2,200. She worked for at least seven owners from 1899 until 1967.. Photo by Larry Kelly

The Edna E. Lockwood is a Chesapeake Bay bugeye, the last working oyster boat of her kind. She is now at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in Saint Michaels, MD. She was built in 1889 at Tilghman Island, MD by John B. Harrison and is of nine-log construction, similar to the smaller log canoe, and was launched on Oct. 5, 1889 for Daniel Haddaway, at a cost of $2,200. She worked for at least seven owners from 1899 until 1967.. Photo by Larry Kelly

the #smallcraft collection at #calvertmarinemuseum #southernmaryland #boats #exhibits

the #smallcraft collection at #calvertmarinemuseum #southernmaryland #boats #exhibits

the #smallcraft collection at #calvertmarinemuseum #southernmaryland #boats #exhibits

the #smallcraft collection at #calvertmarinemuseum #southernmaryland #boats #exhibits

Virginia designated the classic Chesapeake Bay deadrise workboat as the official state boat in 1988. During the first half of the 20th Century, a fleet of these boats worked the Chesapeake for oysters.  Simple but elegant, the deadrise was built specifically to work the shallow, choppy waters of the Chesapeake Bay and its rivers. Many watermen built their own boats, with unique variations on the basic design

Virginia designated the classic Chesapeake Bay deadrise workboat as the official state boat in 1988. During the first half of the 20th Century, a fleet of these boats worked the Chesapeake for oysters. Simple but elegant, the deadrise was built specifically to work the shallow, choppy waters of the Chesapeake Bay and its rivers. Many watermen built their own boats, with unique variations on the basic design

Old Point was one of a fleet of crab dredging boats that operated out of Hampton, VA, at the mouth of the Bay from the 1910s through the 1960s. From December through March, captains and crews lived on their boats so they could leave early every morning and dredge for crabs all day. In the summer and fall, Old Point carried fish and oysters to packing houses or to market.  Old Point’s hull was hewn from seven pine logs. Photo by Larry Kelly

Old Point was one of a fleet of crab dredging boats that operated out of Hampton, VA, at the mouth of the Bay from the 1910s through the 1960s. From December through March, captains and crews lived on their boats so they could leave early every morning and dredge for crabs all day. In the summer and fall, Old Point carried fish and oysters to packing houses or to market. Old Point’s hull was hewn from seven pine logs. Photo by Larry Kelly

100 Years of Swiss Graphic Design @ Museum für Gestaltung Zürich [2012]

100 Years of Swiss Graphic Design @ Museum für Gestaltung Zürich [2012]

the #smallcraft collection at #calvertmarinemuseum #southernmaryland #boats #exhibits

the #smallcraft collection at #calvertmarinemuseum #southernmaryland #boats #exhibits

http://www.boat-links.com/PT/PT2003 bugeye /MorningStar-1.jpg

http://www.boat-links.com/PT/PT2003 bugeye /MorningStar-1.jpg

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