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Community Post: 42 Truly Haunting Pieces Of Art

The Fomorians from Irish mythology are steeped in mystery. It is unknown where they came from, or the length of time they had knowledge of Ireland, and what actually happened to them. Lady Gregory describes one Fomorian habitat as a glass tower in the sea. Many people describe them as sea fairies or sea monsters. My best guess is that they were Nephilim!

Burach Bhadi- Scottish myth: an enormous eel-leech type creature with nine eyes, who lurks in the man-made lochs of Scotland. He drags passing horses into the water and drains them of blood.

♡ In Greek Mythology, the Naiads or Naiades were a type of nymph who presided over fountains, wells, springs, streams, and brooks. They were known to be very ancient spirits that inhabited the still waters of marshes, ponds and lagoon-lakes. The essence of a Naiad was bound to her spring, so if a Naiad’s body of water dried, she would die.

°Goborehinu are Irish Horse-heads; Afanc is the Welsh name for them; the Endrop is the Rumanian version & in Scotland they are called Kelpie's or Highland Water Horses. These fabulous amphibians can be divided into two types: horses of the sea, often called Hippocamps, whose powers over the water are controlled by a higher authority & lake or river horses who are demonic. (Mermaids retreat)

from Telegraph.co.uk

Photographs of marine wildlife found around the coast of the Maldives, Indian Ocean

Photographs of marine wildlife found around the coast of the Maldives, Indian Ocean - Telegraph

The Smew (Mergellus albellus) is a species of duck, and is the only member of the genus Mergellus. This species breeds in the northern taiga of Europe and Asia. It needs trees for breeding. The Smew lives on fish-rich lakes and slow rivers. As a migrant it leaves its breeding areas and winters on sheltered coasts or inland lakes of the Baltic Sea, the Black Sea, northern Germany and the Low Countries, with a small number reaching Great Britain.