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Shape and abstraction: This image uses negative space perfectly - depending how you interperet it, the negative space can either be the sky because it is less dominant, or the buildings, because they are darker and catch your eye less.

negative space: Shape and abstraction: This image uses negative space perfectly - depending how you interperet it, the negative space can either be the sky because it is less dominant, or the buildings, because they are darker and catch your eye less.

Rust Abstract Photography 8 x 10 Fine Art by theheartoftheeye, $15.00

Railroad Rust Alabama [Rust Abstract Photography 8 x 10 Fine Art Yellow Orange Blue Urban Art Photo- Retired Dixie Trains ]

1920's ~ Charleston on a building #vintage photo.

Knee-knocking, palm-sweating, terrifying heights (33 photos)

These two young women illustrate the Flapper era’s penchant for both fun and recklessness by doing the Charleston on a rooftop ledge at Chicago’s Sherman Hotel, 11 Dec Chicago, Illinois,.

Mannequin à la Tour Eiffel, Plaza Athénée, Paris - 1958 - Photo by Christian Lemaire

Paris in style. I don't exactly dress like this but it would be nice to imagine! Mannequin à la Tour Eiffel, by Christian Lemaire.

LucciCo Bijour

May 1955 Model is wearing a two-piece slate blue dress by Heatherlane in McBratney Irish. Gorgeous color for that amazing dress &wall;love the accents of the red flower, & white half sleeved gloves.

This is an image of "flappers" doing the Charleston in 1924. This was a popular dance during this point in time. Pop culture- the Charleston became a common dance among young men and women in the 1920s. People were having a good time going to clubs and drinking alcohol, shopping and living the “high life”. Also, the 1920s was known as the “jazz age” gramophones often played jazz music that was what people did the Charleston dance to.

The Charleston dance became extremely popular in the especially with Flappers. The flappers had a beautiful style that was easier portrayed in posters, as their long dresses created movement to represent the Charleston.

Nadja Auermann (in Galliano) photographed by Patrick Demarchelier for Harper’s Bazaar, January 1995

Nadja Auermann in John Galliano - January 1995 - New York - Harper’s Bazaar - Photo by Patrick Demarchelier. Imagine dancing in this beautiful dress! Must be awesome.

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