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Nun’s Shield, 18th c. José de Páez. Museo Soumaya, Mexico City, Mexico. Photograph by Javier Hinojosa. Brought to you by Vistas: Visual Culture in Spanish America, 1520-1820, a website devoted to the art history and painting of Latin America during the Spanish Colonial period.

Nun’s Shield, 18th c. José de Páez. Museo Soumaya, Mexico City, Mexico. Photograph by Javier Hinojosa. Brought to you by Vistas: Visual Culture in Spanish America, 1520-1820, a website devoted to the art history and painting of Latin America during the Spanish Colonial period.

Colgante de oro, Diquís (Costa Rica) Datación	700-1500 Contexto Cultural/Estilo	Diquis tardío.

Colgante de oro, Diquís (Costa Rica) Datación 700-1500 Contexto Cultural/Estilo Diquis tardío.

Estela-de-Madrid - Museo de América - Ministerio de Educación, Cultura y Deporte - Gobierno de España

Estela-de-Madrid - Museo de América - Ministerio de Educación, Cultura y Deporte - Gobierno de España

C-dice-Trocortesiano - Museo de América - Ministerio de Educación, Cultura y Deporte - Gobierno de España

C-dice-Trocortesiano - Museo de América - Ministerio de Educación, Cultura y Deporte - Gobierno de España

Vasija-de-remeros-sobre-tortuga - Museo de América - Ministerio de Educación, Cultura y Deporte - Gobierno de España

Vasija-de-remeros-sobre-tortuga - Museo de América - Ministerio de Educación, Cultura y Deporte - Gobierno de España

altar numero cuatro la venta - Buscar con Google

altar numero cuatro la venta - Buscar con Google

Hache Kunz. Am. Mus. Of Nat. Hist. NY.  The mouth in the shape of a jaguar and the almond-shaped eyes placed on top of the head lead us to surmise that this figure may represent a chief or a shaman who has transformed himself into a jaguar -- the most powerful hunter in the forests of Mexico and Central America -- to partake of its power. With its economical, taut carving, in which not a single line or mark is wasted, the brilliant sculpture is among the finest jade carvings in history.

Hache Kunz. Am. Mus. Of Nat. Hist. NY. The mouth in the shape of a jaguar and the almond-shaped eyes placed on top of the head lead us to surmise that this figure may represent a chief or a shaman who has transformed himself into a jaguar -- the most powerful hunter in the forests of Mexico and Central America -- to partake of its power. With its economical, taut carving, in which not a single line or mark is wasted, the brilliant sculpture is among the finest jade carvings in history.

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