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The Vieux Carré is the oldest part of New Orleans, founded in 1718.  The city developed around the Vieux Carré ("Old Square"), a central square, today more commonly called the French Quarter. The district as a whole has been designated as a National Historic Landmark, with numerous contributing buildings deemed significant. It includes all the land stretching along the Mississippi River from Canal Street to Esplanade Avenue, inland to North Rampart Street. It equals an area of 78 square…

The Vieux Carré is the oldest part of New Orleans, founded in 1718. The city developed around the Vieux Carré ("Old Square"), a central square, today more commonly called the French Quarter. The district as a whole has been designated as a National Historic Landmark, with numerous contributing buildings deemed significant. It includes all the land stretching along the Mississippi River from Canal Street to Esplanade Avenue, inland to North Rampart Street. It equals an area of 78 square…

The Europeans invested in the building of the Suez Canal, which opened in 1869. Muslim intellectuals and political activists looked for ways to protect Egypt from its inept rulers. The growing Egyptian foreign debt and the strategic importance of the Suez Canal stimulated British and French thoughts of intervention.

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The Europeans invested in the building of the Suez Canal, which opened in 1869. Muslim intellectuals and political activists looked for ways to protect Egypt from its inept rulers. The growing Egyptian foreign debt and the strategic importance of the Suez Canal stimulated British and French thoughts of intervention.

National Trust for Historic Preservation LOSS: THE NEW ORLEANS WOOLWORTH Luxury apartments trumped Civil Rights history in New Orleans when the French Quarter's vacant Woolworth Building was demolished to make way for a residential development whose size and scope was hotly debated by preservationists and some city council members. Built in the 1940s, the Woolworths was the site of the first lunch counter sit-in to be held in the city of New Orleans. It was demolished in October.

National Trust for Historic Preservation LOSS: THE NEW ORLEANS WOOLWORTH Luxury apartments trumped Civil Rights history in New Orleans when the French Quarter's vacant Woolworth Building was demolished to make way for a residential development whose size and scope was hotly debated by preservationists and some city council members. Built in the 1940s, the Woolworths was the site of the first lunch counter sit-in to be held in the city of New Orleans. It was demolished in October.

The court of Versailles was the center of political power in France from 1682, when Louis XIV moved from #Paris, until the royal family was forced to return to the capital in October 1789 after the beginning of the French Revolution. Versailles is therefore famous not only as a building, but as a symbol of the system of absolute monarchy of the Ancien Régime - Get more information from Versailles with the Best TravelApp

The court of Versailles was the center of political power in France from 1682, when Louis XIV moved from #Paris, until the royal family was forced to return to the capital in October 1789 after the beginning of the French Revolution. Versailles is therefore famous not only as a building, but as a symbol of the system of absolute monarchy of the Ancien Régime - Get more information from Versailles with the Best TravelApp

Suez Canal from a NASA image-Work officially began on building the Suez Canal on August 29th, 1859 and it opened a decade latter on November 17, 1869. The British did not relish the idea of a canal under French control because they feared French interference in their commercial and maritime affairs. The P&O had reason for opposing its building for the day it would open their capital investment in Egypt, would be lost and their monopoly on mail and passenger services would be swept away.

Suez Canal from a NASA image-Work officially began on building the Suez Canal on August 29th, 1859 and it opened a decade latter on November 17, 1869. The British did not relish the idea of a canal under French control because they feared French interference in their commercial and maritime affairs. The P&O had reason for opposing its building for the day it would open their capital investment in Egypt, would be lost and their monopoly on mail and passenger services would be swept away.

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