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A Look Inside Track 61, The Secret Train Platform Under The Waldorf-Astoria: Gothamist

A Look Inside Track 61, The Secret Train Platform Under The Waldorf-Astoria: Gothamist

Secret Train Platform Beneath the Waldorf Astoria  Known as Track 61, this secret train platform was once used to discreetly transport elite passengers, including Franklin D. Roosevelt among others, from Grand Central into the Waldorf Astoria Hotel. The clandestine track has a rich history, being used for the first time by General Pershing in 1938, and then later serving as the venue for Andy Warhol’s “Underground Party” in 1965.

Secret Train Platform Beneath the Waldorf Astoria Known as Track 61, this secret train platform was once used to discreetly transport elite passengers, including Franklin D. Roosevelt among others, from Grand Central into the Waldorf Astoria Hotel. The clandestine track has a rich history, being used for the first time by General Pershing in 1938, and then later serving as the venue for Andy Warhol’s “Underground Party” in 1965.

Myrtle Avenue - Looking down the stairs to the platform, where the Masstransiscope has been installed.

Myrtle Avenue - Looking down the stairs to the platform, where the Masstransiscope has been installed.

Anderson–Jerome Avenues - The Anderson Street Station had a wood siding with a shingled roof, two brick chimneys off the roof and two asphalt platforms in both directions. The station also had a garage door on the southern side of the building. No official style of architecture was mentioned for Anderson Street in the 1920 Final Engineering Report due to lack of design.[1] Nearby, a wooden watchman's shanty was constructed near the team track.

Anderson–Jerome Avenues - The Anderson Street Station had a wood siding with a shingled roof, two brick chimneys off the roof and two asphalt platforms in both directions. The station also had a garage door on the southern side of the building. No official style of architecture was mentioned for Anderson Street in the 1920 Final Engineering Report due to lack of design.[1] Nearby, a wooden watchman's shanty was constructed near the team track.

In which we finally get to see the famous secret train platform beneath the Waldorf-Astoria, also known as Track 61, and used by the likes of FDR.

In which we finally get to see the famous secret train platform beneath the Waldorf-Astoria, also known as Track 61, and used by the likes of FDR.

Chambers Street - Like the east side platform, the center platform has no lights of its own, but it's well lit from the open platforms on each side. In 2001, the center was partly boarded up by contractors as work began on station renovations.

Chambers Street - Like the east side platform, the center platform has no lights of its own, but it's well lit from the open platforms on each side. In 2001, the center was partly boarded up by contractors as work began on station renovations.

18th Street - 18 St was chosen as a typical station for publicity photos, perhaps because it had no unusual features.  In stark contrast to the modern photo, the view from the front of a train, just before opening in 1904, shows a well lit station ready for passengers.

18th Street - 18 St was chosen as a typical station for publicity photos, perhaps because it had no unusual features. In stark contrast to the modern photo, the view from the front of a train, just before opening in 1904, shows a well lit station ready for passengers.

Bowery Northbound Platform - This view is from the stairs looking west down the south platform. The escalator would have dropped down just ahead where the three pairs of columns are closer together. In the distance is the stairway up to the closed west mezzanine. The wall at right is the dividing wall between the center tracks.

Bowery Northbound Platform - This view is from the stairs looking west down the south platform. The escalator would have dropped down just ahead where the three pairs of columns are closer together. In the distance is the stairway up to the closed west mezzanine. The wall at right is the dividing wall between the center tracks.

18th Street - Another view of the brand new station shows the stairs and fare controls, with the track just out of frame to the right.  The stairway in center is one of the two exits on this side.  Entering passenger used the two entrance stairways, one of which is barely visible near the left. The dark wood ticket office was between the two entrance stairs, at the extreme left edge of the photo.

18th Street - Another view of the brand new station shows the stairs and fare controls, with the track just out of frame to the right. The stairway in center is one of the two exits on this side. Entering passenger used the two entrance stairways, one of which is barely visible near the left. The dark wood ticket office was between the two entrance stairs, at the extreme left edge of the photo.

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