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A Look Inside Track 61, The Secret Train Platform Under The Waldorf-Astoria: Gothamist

A Look Inside Track 61, The Secret Train Platform Under The Waldorf-Astoria: Gothamist

Secret Train Platform Beneath the Waldorf Astoria  Known as Track 61, this secret train platform was once used to discreetly transport elite passengers, including Franklin D. Roosevelt among others, from Grand Central into the Waldorf Astoria Hotel. The clandestine track has a rich history, being used for the first time by General Pershing in 1938, and then later serving as the venue for Andy Warhol’s “Underground Party” in 1965.

Secret Train Platform Beneath the Waldorf Astoria Known as Track 61, this secret train platform was once used to discreetly transport elite passengers, including Franklin D. Roosevelt among others, from Grand Central into the Waldorf Astoria Hotel. The clandestine track has a rich history, being used for the first time by General Pershing in 1938, and then later serving as the venue for Andy Warhol’s “Underground Party” in 1965.

Track 61: The Mysterious Abandoned Underground Railway Beneath New York’s Waldorf Astoria Hotel - Even so, Track 61 remains a fascinating oddity in the fabric of subterranean New York. The abandoned space is just as off-limits today as it ever was. But as Untapped Cities writes, discerning riders on Metro-North can catch a quick glimpse of the forgotten siding when pulling out of Grand Central Terminal.

Track 61: The Mysterious Abandoned Underground Railway Beneath New York's Waldorf Astoria Hotel

Track 61: The Mysterious Abandoned Underground Railway Beneath New York’s Waldorf Astoria Hotel - Even so, Track 61 remains a fascinating oddity in the fabric of subterranean New York. The abandoned space is just as off-limits today as it ever was. But as Untapped Cities writes, discerning riders on Metro-North can catch a quick glimpse of the forgotten siding when pulling out of Grand Central Terminal.

Court Street - We’re kind of cheating adding Court Street. Although the station is no longer in use and has been thoroughly decommissioned, it’s far from the barren, photogenic wasteland you secretly want it to be. Since summer 1976, Court Street has been the sight of the New York Transit Museum (NYTM); a small museum dedicated to the city’s travel history.

10 Abandoned Subway Stations & Forgotten Platforms of New York City

Court Street - We’re kind of cheating adding Court Street. Although the station is no longer in use and has been thoroughly decommissioned, it’s far from the barren, photogenic wasteland you secretly want it to be. Since summer 1976, Court Street has been the sight of the New York Transit Museum (NYTM); a small museum dedicated to the city’s travel history.

Chambers Street - The location of the original north mezzanine is marked by the rectangle where the stairways penetrated the ceiling.

Chambers Street - The location of the original north mezzanine is marked by the rectangle where the stairways penetrated the ceiling.

Bowery Northbound Platform - This view is from the stairs looking west down the south platform. The escalator would have dropped down just ahead where the three pairs of columns are closer together. In the distance is the stairway up to the closed west mezzanine. The wall at right is the dividing wall between the center tracks.

Bowery Northbound Platform - This view is from the stairs looking west down the south platform. The escalator would have dropped down just ahead where the three pairs of columns are closer together. In the distance is the stairway up to the closed west mezzanine. The wall at right is the dividing wall between the center tracks.

Deserted Places: The Secret Train Platform Under the Waldorf-Astoria in Manhattan

Deserted Places: The Secret Train Platform Under the Waldorf-Astoria in Manhattan

91st Street - You can see the station while riding the 1 train (and the 2/3 if no other trains are in the way) between 86th and 96th Streets. But even as far back as 1999, the New York Times reported that “the walls are begrimed with thick 1970’s-style graffiti.”

91st Street - You can see the station while riding the 1 train (and the 2/3 if no other trains are in the way) between 86th and 96th Streets. But even as far back as 1999, the New York Times reported that “the walls are begrimed with thick 1970’s-style graffiti.”

Anderson–Jerome Avenues - The Anderson Street Station had a wood siding with a shingled roof, two brick chimneys off the roof and two asphalt platforms in both directions. The station also had a garage door on the southern side of the building. No official style of architecture was mentioned for Anderson Street in the 1920 Final Engineering Report due to lack of design.[1] Nearby, a wooden watchman's shanty was constructed near the team track.

Anderson–Jerome Avenues - The Anderson Street Station had a wood siding with a shingled roof, two brick chimneys off the roof and two asphalt platforms in both directions. The station also had a garage door on the southern side of the building. No official style of architecture was mentioned for Anderson Street in the 1920 Final Engineering Report due to lack of design.[1] Nearby, a wooden watchman's shanty was constructed near the team track.

Anderson–Jerome Avenues - At approximately 5:55 a.m. on January 10, 2009, the station building for Anderson Street caught fire and ruptured two propane tanks, which caused the building to explode. Two nearby cars were damaged as well. The three-alarm fire destroyed the building, and causing damage to nearby apartment complex. Twelve fire companies were called to battle the blaze, including fire stations from Teaneck, Ridgefield Park, Bogota and South Hackensack.

Anderson–Jerome Avenues - At approximately 5:55 a.m. on January 10, 2009, the station building for Anderson Street caught fire and ruptured two propane tanks, which caused the building to explode. Two nearby cars were damaged as well. The three-alarm fire destroyed the building, and causing damage to nearby apartment complex. Twelve fire companies were called to battle the blaze, including fire stations from Teaneck, Ridgefield Park, Bogota and South Hackensack.

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