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Vavasour arms on replica European medieval heater shield.

Vavasour arms on replica European medieval heater shield, together with other replica armor.

Detail of some other of the Vavasour arms in the Great Hall at Hazelwood Castle.

Detail of some other of the Vavasour arms in the Great Hall at Hazelwood Castle.

Detail of some other of the Vavasour arms in the Great Hall at Hazelwood Castle.

The Stourton crest of a monk, similar to the Vavasour crest of a cock, appears to have entered the family's arms due to marriage. In this case, the marriage was to a member of the Le Moigne family, whose family name signifies a monk. The crest is sometimes referred to as a monk, with reference to a black Benedictine, and other times as a friar with their russet clothes.

Tomb of Sir Richard Goldesburgh 1504/5 divides the nave from their south chantry chapel at St Mary the Virgin Goldsborough in Yorkshire, the window being presumably blocked when it was added. On one side are the arms of Goldsborough and the names and heraldry of their sons, on the other Vavasour with the names and heraldry of their daughters.

A description of the arms of Vavasour with other donors on the lower end of the roof at Unviversity College Oxford from page 241 of the History and Antiquities of the Colleges and Halls in the University of Oxford by Anthony à Wood (1790).

From Heraldic Design - A Handbook for Students By Heather Child (1965). Indicates why the 16th century Achievement of Arms of Sir Thomas Vavasour likely had a mantle of Gules doubled argent with gold tassels, rather than a mantle of sable doubled or.

A blazon of Vavasour, from a pedigree of Gascoigne, from page 137 of the Visitation of Yorkshire in the Years 1563 and 1564 by William Flower, edited by Charles Norcliffe (1881). Blazon - Or, a fece dauncey Sable.

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