Explore Ww1 Photographs, German Aviator and more!

Explore related topics

Edward Vernon Rickenbacker, Columbus, OH (October 8, 1890 – July 23, 1973) was an American fighter ace in World War I and Medal of Honor recipient. With 26 aerial victories, he was America's most successful fighter ace in the war. He was also a race car driver and automotive designer, a government consultant in military matters and a pioneer in air transportation, particularly as the longtime head of Eastern Air Lines.

Edward Vernon Rickenbacker, Columbus, OH (October 8, 1890 – July 23, 1973) was an American fighter ace in World War I and Medal of Honor recipient. With 26 aerial victories, he was America's most successful fighter ace in the war. He was also a race car driver and automotive designer, a government consultant in military matters and a pioneer in air transportation, particularly as the longtime head of Eastern Air Lines.

Wilfrid Reid "Wop" May OBE DFC (March 20, 1896 – June 21, 1952), was a Canadian flying ace in the First World War and a leading post-war aviator. He was the final allied pilot to be pursued by Manfred von Richthofen before the German ace was shot down on the Western Front in 1918. After the war, May returned to Canada pioneering the role of a bush pilot while working for Canadian Airways in Northern Alberta and the Northwest Territories.

Wilfrid Reid "Wop" May OBE DFC (March 20, 1896 – June 21, 1952), was a Canadian flying ace in the First World War and a leading post-war aviator. He was the final allied pilot to be pursued by Manfred von Richthofen before the German ace was shot down on the Western Front in 1918. After the war, May returned to Canada pioneering the role of a bush pilot while working for Canadian Airways in Northern Alberta and the Northwest Territories.

greatwar-1914: “ Pilots from Oswald Boelcke’s elite fighter squadron, Jasta 2. The German ace trained them to fly in disciplined formations and use sophisticated tactics. Here are some of Boelcke’s rules for fighter combat: • Try to secure advantages...

greatwar-1914: “ Pilots from Oswald Boelcke’s elite fighter squadron, Jasta 2. The German ace trained them to fly in disciplined formations and use sophisticated tactics. Here are some of Boelcke’s rules for fighter combat: • Try to secure advantages...

German Aviator Lt. Josef Mai, recipient of the Iron Cross (first and second class) who during the Great War was credited with 30 aerial victories. He fought during the German offensive for Paris, and fought around Warsaw on the Eastern Front in 1915. Later fighting on the Western Front would have him involved with dogfights during both the Battle of Verdun and Battle of the Somme. During World War II, he was a flight instructor for the Luftwaffe. He died in 1982, at the age of 94.

German Aviator Lt. Josef Mai, recipient of the Iron Cross (first and second class) who during the Great War was credited with 30 aerial victories. He fought during the German offensive for Paris, and fought around Warsaw on the Eastern Front in 1915. Later fighting on the Western Front would have him involved with dogfights during both the Battle of Verdun and Battle of the Somme. During World War II, he was a flight instructor for the Luftwaffe. He died in 1982, at the age of 94.

Oswald Boelcke (19 May 1891 – 28 October 1916) was a German flying ace of the First World War and one of the most influential patrol leaders and tacticians of the early years of air combat. Boelcke is considered the father of the German fighter air force; he was the first to formalize rules of air fighting. While he promulgated rules for the individual pilot, his main concern was the use of formation fighting rather than single effort.

Oswald Boelcke (19 May 1891 – 28 October 1916) was a German flying ace of the First World War and one of the most influential patrol leaders and tacticians of the early years of air combat. Boelcke is considered the father of the German fighter air force; he was the first to formalize rules of air fighting. While he promulgated rules for the individual pilot, his main concern was the use of formation fighting rather than single effort.

Vizefeldwebel Oskar Hennrich was a World War I flying ace credited with 20 aerial victories. He was a notable balloon buster, as 13 of his wins were destructions of observation balloons. He was the leading ace of his squadron.  He was awarded the Military Merit Cross on 3 November 1918, thus receiving a monthly stipend, which was maintained even after the end of the Prussian monarchy in November 1918 through the Third Reich era.

Vizefeldwebel Oskar Hennrich was a World War I flying ace credited with 20 aerial victories. He was a notable balloon buster, as 13 of his wins were destructions of observation balloons. He was the leading ace of his squadron. He was awarded the Military Merit Cross on 3 November 1918, thus receiving a monthly stipend, which was maintained even after the end of the Prussian monarchy in November 1918 through the Third Reich era.

Max von Müller, a locksmith from Rottenburg, Bavaria's best fighter pilot by his Albotros biplane.

Max von Müller, a locksmith from Rottenburg, Bavaria's best fighter pilot by his Albotros biplane.

Pinterest
Search