Shoppers at a supermercado in Havana that featured random leftovers from other countries, but no fresh meat or produce. (Photo: Lisette Poole for The New York Times)

Shoppers at a supermercado in Havana that featured random leftovers from other countries, but no fresh meat or produce. (Photo: Lisette Poole for The New York Times)

Some producers use fistfuls of garlic, others just pinches; some leave the liver in for the rich flavor it adds to the stuffing, while others consider that bizarre; some perfume the meat with rosemary, but many say that only fennel pollen has the true flavor of Umbria. (Photo: Chris Warde-Jones for The New York Times)

Some producers use fistfuls of garlic, others just pinches; some leave the liver in for the rich flavor it adds to the stuffing, while others consider that bizarre; some perfume the meat with rosemary, but many say that only fennel pollen has the true flavor of Umbria. (Photo: Chris Warde-Jones for The New York Times)

Zoe Tew, a home baker who manages the Mrs King’s Pork Pies stall at Borough Market in London, said the surge in interest in baking in the country was annoying “because baking, that’s always been my thing. Now it’s everybody’s thing.” (Photo: David Azia for The New York Times)

Zoe Tew, a home baker who manages the Mrs King’s Pork Pies stall at Borough Market in London, said the surge in interest in baking in the country was annoying “because baking, that’s always been my thing. Now it’s everybody’s thing.” (Photo: David Azia for The New York Times)

Lan Guijun is the head chef of Jade Orchid, a small restaurant in a lane in Chengdu that specializes in delicate, modern versions of Sichuan dishes made with a Japanese-inspired emphasis on simplicity and presentation. (Photo: Adam Dean for The New York Times)

Lan Guijun is the head chef of Jade Orchid, a small restaurant in a lane in Chengdu that specializes in delicate, modern versions of Sichuan dishes made with a Japanese-inspired emphasis on simplicity and presentation. (Photo: Adam Dean for The New York Times)

Megan Kimble, the editor of Edible Baja Arizona magazine, shopping at a farmers’ market in Tucson. (Photo: Chris Hinkle for The New York Times)

Megan Kimble, the editor of Edible Baja Arizona magazine, shopping at a farmers’ market in Tucson. (Photo: Chris Hinkle for The New York Times)

Sichuanese cooking has been conquering the world. It has become China’s favorite out-of-home dining, sold in countless restaurants that often advertise its trademark chile heat. Here, a wholesale spice market frequented by chefs in Chengdu, China. (Photo: Adam Dean for The New York Times)

Sichuanese cooking has been conquering the world. It has become China’s favorite out-of-home dining, sold in countless restaurants that often advertise its trademark chile heat. Here, a wholesale spice market frequented by chefs in Chengdu, China. (Photo: Adam Dean for The New York Times)

Rapid growth, especially in the last decade, has debased much restaurant cooking, drowning the tastes and textures of dishes like fish-fragrant eggplant in gobs of acrid chile, oil and monosodium glutamate. Menus are often narrowed to dauntingly spicy dishes, like boiled duck-blood curd and tripe in chile broth, ignoring the great variety and nuance of the cuisine. (Photo: Adam Dean for The New York Times)

Rapid growth, especially in the last decade, has debased much restaurant cooking, drowning the tastes and textures of dishes like fish-fragrant eggplant in gobs of acrid chile, oil and monosodium glutamate. Menus are often narrowed to dauntingly spicy dishes, like boiled duck-blood curd and tripe in chile broth, ignoring the great variety and nuance of the cuisine. (Photo: Adam Dean for The New York Times)

Porchetta is a simple and festive preparation, like a whole pig roast in the American South. It’s from the Umbrian farming tradition, not a professional butcher’s masterpiece like the famous salamis from nearby Norcia. (Photo: Chris Warde-Jones for The New York Times)

Porchetta is a simple and festive preparation, like a whole pig roast in the American South. It’s from the Umbrian farming tradition, not a professional butcher’s masterpiece like the famous salamis from nearby Norcia. (Photo: Chris Warde-Jones for The New York Times)

The executive chef, Jake Nemmers, left, and the chef and an owner, Ignacio Mattos, in the kitchen at Flora Bar. (Photo: Daniel Krieger for The New York Times)

The executive chef, Jake Nemmers, left, and the chef and an owner, Ignacio Mattos, in the kitchen at Flora Bar. (Photo: Daniel Krieger for The New York Times)

Kramer craved a papaya hot dog. (Photo: Tony Cenicola/The New York Times)

Kramer craved a papaya hot dog. (Photo: Tony Cenicola/The New York Times)

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