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Shoppers at a supermercado in Havana that featured random leftovers from other countries, but no fresh meat or produce. (Photo: Lisette Poole for The New York Times)

For Cuban Home Cooks, Ingenuity and Luck Are Key Ingredients

Shoppers at a supermercado in Havana that featured random leftovers from other countries, but no fresh meat or produce. (Photo: Lisette Poole for The New York Times)

State-manufactured soy cooking oil in Cuba. (Photo: Lisette Poole for The New York Times)

For Cuban Home Cooks, Ingenuity and Luck Are Key Ingredients

State-manufactured soy cooking oil in Cuba. (Photo: Lisette Poole for The New York Times)

Sichuanese cooking has been conquering the world. It has become China’s favorite out-of-home dining, sold in countless restaurants that often advertise its trademark chile heat. Here, a wholesale spice market frequented by chefs in Chengdu, China. (Photo: Adam Dean for The New York Times)

Cooking with the New York Times

In Chengdu, the capital of Sichuan Province, the region’s famed cuisine is more popular than ever. But traditionalists worry it’s drowning in spice.

Residents in Cuba like Yolanda Horruitiner, above, shopping at a pricey farmers’ cooperative market, struggle to find ingredients to stock their kitchens. (Photo: Lisette Poole for The New York Times)

For Cuban Home Cooks, Ingenuity and Luck Are Key Ingredients

Residents in Cuba like Yolanda Horruitiner, above, shopping at a pricey farmers’ cooperative market, struggle to find ingredients to stock their kitchens. (Photo: Lisette Poole for The New York Times)

The lunch crowd at Hobby’s. (Photo: Bryan Anselm for The New York Times)

Pastrami Is the Priority at These Old-School New Jersey Delis

The lunch crowd at Hobby’s. (Photo: Bryan Anselm for The New York Times)

“Sichuanese cuisine really faces a crisis,” said Wang Kaifa, a 71-year-old chef who has been leading a campaign against what he sees as the creeping debasement of the region’s celebrated cooking. (Photo: Adam Dean for The New York Times)

Cooking with the New York Times

“Sichuanese cuisine really faces a crisis,” said Wang Kaifa, a chef who has been leading a campaign against what he sees as the creeping debasement of the region’s celebrated cooking. (Photo: Adam Dean for The New York Times)

At Mzoli’s, meat is cooked quickly over eight roaring braais. (Photo: Joao Silva/The New York Times)

South Africa, One Nation United by the Grill

At Mzoli’s, meat is cooked quickly over eight roaring braais. (Photo: Joao Silva/The New York Times)

La Cocina de Esteban in Havana serves Italian, Spanish and Cuban cuisine, but an owner said it can be difficult to obtain even staples like coffee. (Photo: Eliana Aponte Tobar for The New York Times)

What, Reserve a Table? Cubans Confront a New Dining Culture

Restaurants and diners face some quandaries as the old ways meet the new.

When Mr. Redzepi was searching for Australian foragers to help with the pop-up, Mr. Holland appeared with a truck full of curious bounty. (Photo: Paul van Kan for The New York Times)

In Australia, Noma Forages for Ingredients and Inspiration

Redzepi was searching for Australian foragers to help with the pop-up, Mr. Holland appeared with a truck full of curious bounty. (Photo: Paul van Kan for The New York Times)

The chefs pay no rent; the hope is that they’ll build a following and create their own restaurants. (Photo: Jeff Swensen for The New York Times)

Pittsburgh’s Youth-Driven Food Boom

The chefs pay no rent; the hope is that they’ll build a following and create their own restaurants. (Photo: Jeff Swensen for The New York Times)

Maggie Rounsavall sips a Topo Chico at Jo’s Coffee in Austin, Tex. (Photo: Ilana Panich-Linsman for The New York Times)

How Do Texans Beat the Heat? With Water From Mexico

Bottles of fizzy Topo Chico are a favorite in restaurants, bars and stores, even though marketing is minimal.

Anthony and Jennifer Arceneaux own the 33-year-old restaurant. (Photo: James Billeaudeau for The New York Times)

Where Crawfish Are Boiled, Fried and Celebrated

Anthony and Jennifer Arceneaux own the restaurant. (Photo: James Billeaudeau for The New York Times)

Whitfield opened in December; reaction was quick and unexpected. “On New Year’s Eve, we had a line around the building,” the executive chef Bethany Zozula said. (Photo: Jeff Swensen for The New York Times)

Pittsburgh’s Youth-Driven Food Boom

Pittsburgh’s restaurants help fuel an influx of younger residents.

Attendees at Porchettiamo, a new festival devoted to porchetta in San Terenziano, Italy. (Photo: Chris Warde-Jones for The New York Times)

Paying Tribute to Porchetta, the Ancient Italian Pig Roast

Attendees at Porchettiamo, a new festival devoted to porchetta in San Terenziano, Italy. (Photo: Chris Warde-Jones for The New York Times)

Some producers use fistfuls of garlic, others just pinches; some leave the liver in for the rich flavor it adds to the stuffing, while others consider that bizarre; some perfume the meat with rosemary, but many say that only fennel pollen has the true flavor of Umbria. (Photo: Chris Warde-Jones for The New York Times)

Paying Tribute to Porchetta, the Ancient Italian Pig Roast

Some producers use fistfuls of garlic, others just pinches; some leave the liver in for the rich flavor it adds to the stuffing, while others consider that bizarre; some perfume the meat with rosemary, but many say that only fennel pollen has the true flavor of Umbria. (Photo: Chris Warde-Jones for The New York Times)

South Africa’s national pastime, braai or grilling, cuts across ethnicity, race and class.

Braai Culture

They call it braai, an outdoor cooking ritual with many rules but no limits.

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