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An a ssassin fly ("Pegesimallus sp.") eating a termite by sucking its dissolved tissue (Photo by Rob Felix)

Assassin flies are predators that hunt and feed on other insects.

An assassin fly ("Chrysopogon sp") eating a bee. (Photo by Jean and Fred Hort)

Assassin flies are predators that hunt and feed on other insects.

Spiders have always been known to feed on insects, but zoologists from the University of Basel, the US, and the UK have now been able to show that their diet is more diverse than expected. Their fi…

Veggie-eating spiders have been found on every continent except Antarctica, a new study notes.

Credit: Piotr Naskrecki/Conservation International While most katydids are herbivorous and feed on leaves, this species (Copiphora longicauda) uses its powerful, sharp mandibles to prey upon insects and other invertebrates. It is a member of the aptly named group of conehead katydids

Sixty new species found in Suriname – in pictures

Bug-eating conehead While most katydids are herbivorous and feed on leaves, this species (Copiphora longicauda) uses its powerful, sharp mandibles to prey upon insects and other invertebrates. It is a member of the aptly named group of conehead katydids.

Among 14 newly described species of tarantula is Aphonopelma johnnycashi, which lives near Folsom Prison in California.

New tarantula named after Johnny Cash

This new species of black tarantula found in Folsom, California, has been named Aphonopelma johnnycashi in honour of Folsom Prison Blues legend Johnny Cash

The delicate build and sabre-like pedipalps of this Brazilian clubionid spider help it to mimic the painfully-stinging trap-jaw ants of the genus Odontomachus.  Morretes, Paraná, Brazil

Myrmecium latreillei ant mimic spider The delicate build and sabre-like pedipalps of this Brazilian Myrmecium latreillei spider help it to mimic the painfully-stinging trap-jaw ants of the genus Odontomachus.

Inside the Gorgeous and Mysterious World of Plankton | WIRED

Inside the Gorgeous and Mysterious World of Plankton

Out today is "Plankton: Wonders of the Drifting World," a positively stunning book that features some of the most intriguing, most beautiful plankton around.

Inside the Gorgeous and Mysterious World of Plankton | WIRED

Inside the Gorgeous and Mysterious World of Plankton

Inside the Gorgeous and Mysterious World of Plankton | WIRED

Freshwater hydra don't lose fertility or become any more likely to die as they age. In perfect conditions, they may live forever.

Hail the Hydra, an Animal That May Be Immortal

Hail the Hydra, an Animal That May Be Immortal. Freshwater hydra don't lose fertility or become any more likely to die as they age. In perfect conditions, they may live forever.

Scientific Illustration | thinkingdifferent: Terrific vintage...

1891 Vintage Print Insects, Locust Gryllotalpa Cricket Antique Chromolithograph, Entomology wall decor, via CarambasVintage at Etsy 60121555

A baby squid, photo SHARIF MIRSHAK

Inside the Gorgeous and Mysterious World of Plankton

A baby squid, photo SHARIF MIRSHAK

Turtle eating a jellyfish

Turtle eating a jellyfish

Kea Parrot

The Kea is a large species of parrot found on the South Island of New Zealand. Although it is mostly olive green, it has brilliant orange under its wings. They are known for their intelligence and curiousity. The kea is the world's only alpine parrot.

White-nose syndrome has officials at Mount St. Helens trying to protect bats from people

Photo of little brown bat confirmed with white-nose syndrome from King County, Washington Photo credit: Progressive Animal Welfare Society (PAWS)

Holothurian Hugs Photography

Holothurian Hugs Photography

A female Phronima, left, holds her progeny against the wall of the barrel — a structure built using leftovers from its prey. She feeds the young for two or three weeks, making sure they stay bunched together inside. A group of young Phronima, right, escaped from the barrel, but were caught by their mother and brought back inside.

A female Phronima, left, holds her progeny against the wall of the barrel — a structure built using leftovers from its prey. She feeds the young for two or three weeks, making sure they stay bunched together inside. A group of young Phronima, right, escaped from the barrel, but were caught by their mother and brought back inside.

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