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Five animal-head posts were found in the Oseberg burial mound, Norway. Four in the burial chamber, the fifth in the fore ship.  Viking Ship Museum located at Bygdøy in Oslo, Norway.

Five animal-head posts were found in the Oseberg burial mound, Norway. Four in the burial chamber, the fifth in the fore ship. Viking Ship Museum located at Bygdøy in Oslo, Norway.

This dragon-head post was found in the Oseberg Viking Ship when it was discovered inside a burial mound at the Osberg farm near Tønsberg in Vestfold County, Norway. Scholars believe the ship was buried around 834 AD.  It was excavated between 1904-05. The ship, and the post, are now part of the collections at the Viking Ship Museum located on Oslo's beautiful Bygdøy Peninsula. Scholars are not sure about the purpose of this dragon-head post.

This dragon-head post was found in the Oseberg Viking Ship when it was discovered inside a burial mound at the Osberg farm near Tønsberg in Vestfold County, Norway. Scholars believe the ship was buried around 834 AD. It was excavated between 1904-05. The ship, and the post, are now part of the collections at the Viking Ship Museum located on Oslo's beautiful Bygdøy Peninsula. Scholars are not sure about the purpose of this dragon-head post.

Five animal-head posts were found in the Oseberg burial mound, Norway. Four in the burial chamber, the fifth in the fore ship. Together with each one was found a rattle made of iron and rope, sometimes with the rope running though the mouth of the beast. Possibly used for protection – on buildings, ships, and even on high seats. They all originally had horizontal shafts fixed to them near their base. It is likely the heads and the rattles were carried in procession as part of the burial…

Five animal-head posts were found in the Oseberg burial mound, Norway. Four in the burial chamber, the fifth in the fore ship. Together with each one was found a rattle made of iron and rope, sometimes with the rope running though the mouth of the beast. Possibly used for protection – on buildings, ships, and even on high seats. They all originally had horizontal shafts fixed to them near their base. It is likely the heads and the rattles were carried in procession as part of the burial…

Closeup of a carving on a Viking horse cart in the Viking Ship Museum located at Bygdøy in Oslo, Norway.

Closeup of a carving on a Viking horse cart in the Viking Ship Museum located at Bygdøy in Oslo, Norway.

Closeup of a carving on a Viking horse cart in the Viking Ship Museum located at Bygdøy in Oslo, Norway.

Closeup of a carving on a Viking horse cart in the Viking Ship Museum located at Bygdøy in Oslo, Norway.

Closeup of a carving on a Viking horse cart in the Viking Ship Museum located at Bygdøy in Oslo, Norway.

Closeup of a carving on a Viking horse cart in the Viking Ship Museum located at Bygdøy in Oslo, Norway.

Terracotta lion’s – head waterspout, 5th c.B.C.

Terracotta lion’s – head waterspout, 5th c.B.C.

This dragon-head post was found in the Oseberg Viking Ship. The reason the ships have survived more than 1,000 years is that Viking chieftains were buried in them. To protect these leaders in the afterlife, the ships were encased under mounds of clay, which protected the wood from decay. Nobles took their possessions with them for the afterlife and many of these artifacts are on display in the museum. Inspect their beds, sledges, textiles, tools and household utensils.  Norway

This dragon-head post was found in the Oseberg Viking Ship. The reason the ships have survived more than 1,000 years is that Viking chieftains were buried in them. To protect these leaders in the afterlife, the ships were encased under mounds of clay, which protected the wood from decay. Nobles took their possessions with them for the afterlife and many of these artifacts are on display in the museum. Inspect their beds, sledges, textiles, tools and household utensils. Norway

Viking Age Scandinavia; A wealthy Viking would likely have a complete ensemble of a spear, one or two javelins, a wooden shield, and either a battle axe or a sword. The very richest might have a helmet, other armour is thought to have been limited to the nobility and their professional warriors. The average farmer was likely limited to a spear, shield, and perhaps a common axe or a large knife. Some would bring their hunting bows to use in the opening stages of battle, as well.

Viking Age Scandinavia; A wealthy Viking would likely have a complete ensemble of a spear, one or two javelins, a wooden shield, and either a battle axe or a sword. The very richest might have a helmet, other armour is thought to have been limited to the nobility and their professional warriors. The average farmer was likely limited to a spear, shield, and perhaps a common axe or a large knife. Some would bring their hunting bows to use in the opening stages of battle, as well.

The Oseberg ship is a well-preserved Viking ship discovered in a large burial mound at the Oseberg farm near Tønsberg in Vestfold county, Norway. The Oseberg burial mound contained numerous grave goods and two female human skeletons. The ship's interment into its burial mound dates from 834 AD, but parts of the ship date from around 800, and the ship itself is thought to be older. It was excavated by Norwegian archaeologist Haakon Shetelig and Swedish archaeologist Gabriel Gustafson in…

The Oseberg ship is a well-preserved Viking ship discovered in a large burial mound at the Oseberg farm near Tønsberg in Vestfold county, Norway. The Oseberg burial mound contained numerous grave goods and two female human skeletons. The ship's interment into its burial mound dates from 834 AD, but parts of the ship date from around 800, and the ship itself is thought to be older. It was excavated by Norwegian archaeologist Haakon Shetelig and Swedish archaeologist Gabriel Gustafson in…

Dynastinae or rhinoceros beetles are a subfamily of the scarab beetle family (Scarabaeidae). Other common names – some for particular groups of rhinoceros beetles – are for example Hercules beetles, unicorn beetles or horn beetles. Over 300 species of rhinoceros beetles are known.  These are hand crafted beetles made out of wire.  For sale in the town of Takayama, Japan.

Dynastinae or rhinoceros beetles are a subfamily of the scarab beetle family (Scarabaeidae). Other common names – some for particular groups of rhinoceros beetles – are for example Hercules beetles, unicorn beetles or horn beetles. Over 300 species of rhinoceros beetles are known. These are hand crafted beetles made out of wire. For sale in the town of Takayama, Japan.

Sweetgrass basket made by Lorena Langley, basket weaver, Coushatta Tribe of LA.

Sweetgrass basket made by Lorena Langley, basket weaver, Coushatta Tribe of LA.

Olive wood products, Corfu, Greece. Homer described the olive tree as sacred. Odysseus made the bridal bed from olive wood and Polyphemus manufactured his bat.

Olive wood products, Corfu, Greece. Homer described the olive tree as sacred. Odysseus made the bridal bed from olive wood and Polyphemus manufactured his bat.

Daikoku (Seven Lucky Gods) is variously considered to be the god of wealth, or of the household, particularly the kitchen. He is recognized by his wide face, smile, and a flat black hat. He is often portrayed holding a golden mallet called an Uchide no kozuchi, otherwise known as a magic money mallet, and is seen seated on bales of rice, with mice nearby signifying plentiful food. Seen here in the workshop of Kamazawa Kutani Ceramic Ware, Japan.

Daikoku (Seven Lucky Gods) is variously considered to be the god of wealth, or of the household, particularly the kitchen. He is recognized by his wide face, smile, and a flat black hat. He is often portrayed holding a golden mallet called an Uchide no kozuchi, otherwise known as a magic money mallet, and is seen seated on bales of rice, with mice nearby signifying plentiful food. Seen here in the workshop of Kamazawa Kutani Ceramic Ware, Japan.

Lion dance is a form of traditional dance in Chinese culture and other Asian countries in which performers mimic a lion's movements in a lion costume. The lion dance is usually performed during the Chinese New Year and other Chinese traditional, cultural and religious festivals. Versions of the lion dance are also found in Japan, Korea, Vietnam, and Tibet. Lion dance mask in the Karakuri museum exhibit in Takayama, Japan

Lion dance is a form of traditional dance in Chinese culture and other Asian countries in which performers mimic a lion's movements in a lion costume. The lion dance is usually performed during the Chinese New Year and other Chinese traditional, cultural and religious festivals. Versions of the lion dance are also found in Japan, Korea, Vietnam, and Tibet. Lion dance mask in the Karakuri museum exhibit in Takayama, Japan