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Comets always have had a relation with superstitious beliefs and in this part Pliny the Elder uses the metaphor of 'a pair of flutes'. I might need a flute-musician to 'invent' this metaphor in a way a farmer would recognise 'an ear of corn' and a fisher a 'flying fish'. Basically, in my opinion, there are hundreds, if not thousands of metaphors for these significant astronomical events.

Comets always have had a relation with superstitious beliefs and in this part Pliny the Elder uses the metaphor of 'a pair of flutes'. I might need a flute-musician to 'invent' this metaphor in a way a farmer would recognise 'an ear of corn' and a fisher a 'flying fish'. Basically, in my opinion, there are hundreds, if not thousands of metaphors for these significant astronomical events.

Some metaphors of the shape of comets are related to weapons: arrows, darts, spears, axes and swords...

Some metaphors of the shape of comets are related to weapons: arrows, darts, spears, axes and swords.

'Red or reddish hair' might be a very ancient metaphor for a comet. Comets like Halley's Comet appear reddish at sunrise (or sunset) and the importance and use of  or red Ochre in the past might be related to early beliefs of the returning soul-king and star-destination of the human soul in the afterlife. My opinion ofcourse. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ochre

'Red or reddish hair' might be a very ancient metaphor for a comet. Comets like Halley's Comet appear reddish at sunrise (or sunset) and the importance and use of or red Ochre in the past might be related to early beliefs of the returning soul-king and star-destination of the human soul in the afterlife. My opinion ofcourse. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ochre

The shape the tail(s) of a comet can change  so the metaphors that describe the apparel  of a comet changes also.

The shape the tail(s) of a comet can change so the metaphors that describe the apparel of a comet changes also.

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