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My first painting, it's not brilliant but it's not bad either!

Zander Olsen Tree, Line ‘This is an ongoing series of constructed photographs rooted in the forest. These works, carried out in Surrey, Hampshire and Wales,involve site specific interventions in the landscape, ‘wrapping’ trees with white material to construct a visual relationship between tree, not-tree and the line of horizon according to the camera’s viewpoint.’

Violin Art Print from Painting Colorful Bold Music Lover Musical Instrument Strings CANVAS Ready To Hang Large Artwork Classy Contemporary

It’s what you don’t get to see and what Portugal-based artist, Cristina Troufa forces you to focus on that makes her work so intense…it’s her ability to draw you in on the perspectives of her subjects. The way she borders them off – choosing to leave certain areas devoid of color seems to harnesses all the emotion of the piece into the features and flesh of her portraits, making them truly live.

My favourite ever painting by Rousseau. When it came to the Leeds Art Gallery words can't describe how I felt. It's just stunning!

Kids Get Arty - Exploring David Hockney & Photo Montage

David Hockney - I do really like this picture I think their unique as their are so many different things happening within the picture. I love this off the country side with so many bright, vibrant colours, with some cool different shapes pulled together.

The Roy Lichtenstein Foundation- This painting is at the Nelson Atkins Museum in Kansas City. Why do you think Lichtenstein painted a still life like it was a comic? What does this say about what he thinks about art?

A painting that is from generations ago yet is probably one of the most recognizable pieces of artwork not to mention it is also an emoji. This notorious Japanese masterpiece of the waves are a wonderful representation of nature in one of its rawest forms. The waves are monstrous and full of power and mystique. ”Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji” woodblock print by KATSUSHIKA Hokusai (1760-1849), Japan 葛飾北斎 富嶽三十六景