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Cossit Library and Custom House, Memphis, TN: Lost Treasure. A lot of buildings have been torn down in Tennessee History.

The Cossitt Library (the red brick building on the left) in Memphis, Tennessee, provides books and a librarian for a collection to be housed in the LeMoyne Normal Institute, a school for African-American students established in

Southern Bowling Lanes, Memphis. Lost Treasure. A lot of buildings have been torn down in Tennessee History.

A lot of buildings have been torn down in Tennessee History.

Jerry's Sno Cones, Memphis | by Jessi Scherr

No doubt the best sno cones in Memphis. They really are the best, since the sno-cream castle closed!

Trolley and Orpheum theater sign by night. Memphis, Tennessee, USA (color)  Looks like the first visit to the Orpheum will be for the Ostrander awards :)

Trolley and Orpheum theater sign by night. Memphis, Tennessee, USA (color) Looks like the first visit to the Orpheum will be for the Ostrander awards :)

Klinke Brothers' giant ice cream tub sign has been in place since 1987.

Klinke Brothers' giant ice cream tub sign has been in place since

Memphis

Memphis, TN founded, incorporated on

Sultana Disaster    Memorial to the Sultana Disaster in Elmwood Cemetery, Memphis, Tennessee. On 27 April 1865 the SS Sultana exploded just north of Memphis, Tennessee on the Mississippi River. Of the 2400 people onboard, 1700 died. Most of the passengers were newly freed Union POWs heading home. At 2am the boilers exploded.

Sultana Memorial in Elmwood Cemetery, Memphis, Tennessee: On April the SS Sultana exploded just north of Memphis, Tennessee on the Mississippi River. Of the 2400 people on board, 1700 died. Most of the passengers were newly freed Union POWs heading home

THE HOUSE THAT COTTON BUILT by Midge Gurley on Capture Memphis // Isaac Kirtland and Benjamin Babb gave the house its beginnings between 1852 and 1883.  But the James Columbus Neely and Barton Lee Mallory families embellished the house and gifted the city this wonderful Italianate mansion.   Neely was a Cotton Factor and his son-in-law, Mallory, was in the Cotton Warehousing business.

THE HOUSE THAT COTTON BUILT by Midge Gurley on Capture Memphis // Isaac Kirtland and Benjamin Babb gave the house its beginnings between 1852 and 1883. But the James Columbus Neely and Barton Lee Mallory families embellished the house and gifted the city this wonderful Italianate mansion. Neely was a Cotton Factor and his son-in-law, Mallory, was in the Cotton Warehousing business.

The South's Tastiest Towns 2013 | Memphis, TN | SouthernLiving.com

The South's Tastiest Towns: Memphis

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