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Just Another Day in Old Florida Cutting Board

Curlew at RSPB Titchwell on 7th Jan 2014. When I was a child, the sound of these birds meant long, light summer evenings. We called them Peewits.

Originating in Hungary, the Racka has existed since at least the 1800, when the first registry was established. It is a hardy, multi-purpose breed. Their wool is long and coarse - rams 132 lb (60 kg). The breed's unique appearance + quiet disposition would make it a desirable animal for hobby situations.

Wasp Moth ~ Miks' Pics "Arachnids and Insects l" board @

According to North American Native tradition, the Blue Heron brings messages of self-determination and self-reliance. They represent an ability to progress and evolve. The long thin legs of the heron reflect that an individual doesn't need great massive pillars to remain stable, but must be able to stand on one's own.

Jaguarundi aka Otter Cat, medium size wild cat native to south and central America, and a few have been spotted in Florida, Texas, and other southern states.

This picture is of Whirling Horse. I consider this photograph to be a classic, and shows the man with full head dress, buckskin clothing, and blanket. It is believed that Whirling Horse was a member of a Wild West Show, possibly Buffalo Bill Cody's. So, in looking at the picture we must wonder whether this is the way he looked as a traditional Indian person, or whether this is how Buffalo Bill told him he should dress for the show.

Kookaburra- reminds me of a song I was taught in kindergarten. Kookaburra sits in an old gum tree counting all the monkeys he can see, laugh, kookaburra laugh, kookaburra thats no monkey thats me.

from Adam's Art and Bonsai Blog

A twisted pomegranate, a 250 year old oak and an art class

The Treaty Oak is a field live oak (quercus virginiana) that is the oldest living thing in Jacksonville. It’s called “Treaty Oak” because way back in the 1930’s a journalist wrote a story claiming that a treaty between the native Floridians and the Spanish had been singed beneath it. This “journalist” made up the story to save the tree from a developers axe. It worked, for many years the story was believed.