Explore Visit Toronto, Extinct Animals and more!

Explore related topics

Mastodons may not make headlines as much as woolly mammoths. But recent research reveals they were every bit as fascinating as their better-known cousins and more important to prehistoric humans in many parts of Canada and the U.S.

Mastodons may not make headlines as much as woolly mammoths. But recent research reveals they were every bit as fascinating as their better-known cousins and more important to prehistoric humans in many parts of Canada and the U.S.

What’s the Difference Between a Mammoth and a Mastodon? | Mental Floss

What’s the Difference Between a Mammoth and a Mastodon?

What’s the Difference Between a Mammoth and a Mastodon? | Mental Floss

The last woolly mammoths were wracked with genetic disease and had a strange shiny coat, say scientists.

DNA clues to why woolly mammoth died out

The last woolly mammoths were wracked with genetic disease and had a strange shiny coat, say scientists.

10 Animal Candidates for Genetic Resurrection -Woolly Rhinoceros

10 Animal Candidates for Genetic Resurrection

10 Animal Candidates for Genetic Resurrection -Woolly Rhinoceros

Mammoth. Hard to believe he walked the earth and lead the way. Follower's need a broom and scoop.

Mammoth. Hard to believe he walked the earth and lead the way. Follower's need a broom and scoop.

A team of scientists believe they have found evidence of human activity in North America that dates back 130,000 years ago — more than 100,000 years than earlier believed.

Study suggests humans were in North America 100,000 years earlier than believed

A team of scientists believe they have found evidence of human activity in North America that dates back 130,000 years ago — more than 100,000 years than earlier believed.

Underwater discovery near Haida Gwaii could rewrite human history - The Globe and Mail

Underwater discovery near Haida Gwaii could rewrite human history - The Globe and Mail

New archaeological evidence suggests that America was first discovered by Stone Age people from Europe – 10,000 years before the Siberian-originating ancestors of the American Indians set foot in the New World.

New evidence suggests Stone Age hunters from Europe discovered America

New archaeological evidence suggests that America was first discovered by Stone Age people from Europe – 10,000 years before the Siberian-originating ancestors of the American Indians set foot in the New World.

Pinterest
Search