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Space in Images - 2004 - 03 - Cyprus - ASAR - 11 March 2004

Space in Images - 2004 - 03 - Cyprus - ASAR - 11 March 2004

Venus Revealed  This global view of the surface of Venus is centered at 180 degrees east longitude. Magellan synthetic aperture radar mosaics from the first cycle of Magellan mapping are mapped onto a computer-simulated globe to create this image. Data gaps are filled with Pioneer Venus Orbiter data, or a constant mid-range value. Simulated color is used to enhance small-scale structure. The simulated hues are based on color images recorded by the Soviet Venera 13 and 14 spacecraft.

Space Photo of the Day 2012

Venus revealed - This image was made from radar data taken in 1991 by the Magellan spacecraft, which eventually mapped 98 percent of the planet's surface. The bright region at the center of the image is a rugged highland area known as Aphrodite Terra.

Presented here are side-by-side comparisons of a traditional Cassini Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) view and one made using a new technique for handling electronic noise that results in clearer views of Titan's surface. The technique, called despeckling, produces images that can be easier for researchers to interpret.

A New Way to View Titan: 'Despeckle' It. Side-by-side comparisons of a traditional Cassini Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) view and one made using a new technique for handling electronic noise that results in clearer views of Titan's surface.

Spitsbergen, Norway’s largest island, is pictured in this image, acquired on Sep. 6, 2011 by Envisat’s Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR). Bordered by the Arctic Ocean to its north and the Greenland Sea to its west, Spitsbergen is the largest and only permanently populated island of the Svalbard archipelago.

ASAR acquired this image of Spitsbergen—Norway’s largest island—on September The gray scale image shows Spitsbergen’s rugged landscape of high peaks and sprawling glaciers. North of the island is the Arctic Ocean, and the Greenland Sea lies to the west.

Sentinel-1, a Synthetic Aperture Radar in C-band, carries an advanced radar instrument to provide an all-weather, day-and-night supply of continuous imagery of Earth's surface. As a constellation of two satellites orbiting 180 degrees apart, the mission images scan the entire Earth every six days. The mission benefits of numerous services that range from monitoring the Arctic sea-ice extent, a routine sea-ice mapping, a surveillance of the marine environment, including oil-spill

15 Stunning Images of Earth From the European Space Agency’s Satellite – Page 2

Ganges' dazzling delta - observing the Earth (European Space Agency)

Alt-J album cover – An Awesome Wave / photo of Ganges Delta, the world’s largest delta, in the south Asia area of Bangladesh (visible) and India.

On March 17, 2013, NASA’s Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar (UAVSAR) acquired synthetic aperture radar data over the Napo River in Ecuador and Peru.

Napo River in Ecuador and Peru. The pink and yellow colors are indicators of inundation.

The Magellan spacecraft inside the payload bay of the shuttle Atlantis, being prepared for launch. The Magellan spacecraft, also referred to as the Venus Radar Mapper, was a 1,035-kilogram (2,282 lb) robotic space probe launched by NASA on May 4, 1989, to map the surface of Venus by using synthetic aperture radar and to measure the planetary gravitational field.

Magellan being fixed into position inside the payload bay of Atlantis prior to launch.

The 6.0-magnitude earthquake that rocked California's Napa Valley last month not only injured dozens of people and caused millions of dollars in damage, but it also warped the surface of Earth. Observations from the European Space Agency's (ESA) new Sentinel-1A satellite reveal changes on the surface through a technique known as synthetic aperture radar interferometry. Ground deformation leads to small changes in the reflected radar signals, and the resulting interferogram has patterns of…

How the Napa Quake Deformed Earth (Satellite Photo)

Earth-monitoring satellite begins operational life By Darren Quick An interferogram generated by processing two images shows how the ground movedduring the quake that struck California’s Napa Valley on 24 August 2014 (Image: Copernicus data Insarap study)

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