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Terror Bird by ItsAllStock on DeviantArt

Styracosaurus

Styracosaurus (dinosaurio ornitisquio del Cretácico, (Kurt Miller) Most…

Coelacanth (pronouncd 'see-la-canth)   In 1932, Marjorie Courtenay Latimer was a curator of a small museum in East London, South Africa. On December 23rd, she went to visit a friend of hers in order to wish him a merry Christmas. This friend, a local sea Captain, had just returned with a fresh catch. Before leaving, she suddenly noticed something bizarre amongst the caught fish and investigated.

Ten extinct animals that have been rediscovered

Include with Endangered Animals honor. Ten extinct animals that have been rediscovered - Coelacanth

The World's Extinct Animals Cemetery

The World's Extinct Animals Cemetery - Guo Geng created a cemetery for extinct animals in the Nanhaizi David's Deer Park in Beijing.

Paraceratherium (mamífero perisodáctilo del Oligoceno-Mioceno de Asia, 25mA)

Paraceratherium is an extinct genus of gigantic hornless rhinoc-eros-like mammals endemic to Eurasia & Asia during the Oligocene epoch. It is regarded as the largest land mammal known, w/the largest species having an estimated mean adult mass of 12 tons.

The Pyrotheria are a group of extinct mammals that lived during the Eocene and Oligocene in South America and had some similarities with the elephants. But they were not related to this, but are counted to the South American ungulates.

The Pyrotheria are a group of extinct mammals that lived during the Eocene and Oligocene in South America and had some similarities with the elephants. But they were not related to this, but are counted to the South American ungulates.

Although superficially pig-like, Archaeotherium, along with all other entelodonts, was more closely related to anthracotheres, hippopotamuses, and whales. By Mauricio Anton

The entolodont Archaeotherium scares away a pair of the primitive dog Hesperocyon from a watering hole. Oligocene of western North America. By Mauricio Anton from the book "National Geographic: Prehistoric Mammals"

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