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19th century portrait from New Zealand: For Maori peoples, Tā moko represents a person’s mana (status or power) in society. The Moko Kauae  is a chin tattoo traditional reserved for Māori women with mana (high status and power). More at the link.

Looks Like New Zealand Culture. Source Notes: Pare Watene 1878 (you can see the introduction of the black americans, some that fled from slavery to the Indian Nations, where they were accepted, lived free, married and had children)

Black women in Egypt, circa 1905. Right...and Elizabeth Taylor portrayed Cleopatra as a white woman. Hollywood whitewashes history

Black women in Egypt, circa Right.and Elizabeth Taylor portrayed Cleopatra as a white woman.Now they have a movie out called the Egyptain Gods that also whitewash and inaccurate.

Maori Tribesman

Generation Tattoo

Maori tattoos are part of the culture of the Indigenous people of New Zealand. Maori facial tattoos never cross the midline of the face and were used to instil fear in invaders.

Portrait of a woman from the Aperahama family of Manaia, with a hei tiki, cloak, and feathers.

Maori girl wearing Hei Tiki,huia feathers in her hair, ear ornament of ribbon, and korowai (tag cloak).

Irihapeti Te Paea

Complicated little hat, moko (chin tattoo), chunky (remarkably modern) necklace and shiny ruffled bodice - an amazing group of textures.

Tattoed Māori Woman wearing traditional Garb, a Cloak made of Kiwi Feathers

Tattoed Maori woman wearing traditional garb – a cloak made of kiwi feathers.

c.1880s, Mere Nako of Te Atiawa tribe, a 'kuia' (Maori female elder) who lived in Motueka, near Nelson on the north end of the South Island, New Zealand // she is wearing a 'hei-tiki,' a traditional Maori pendant usually made out of pounamu (greenstone)

cr Mere Nako of Te Atiawa tribe, a 'kuia' (Maori female elder) who lived in Motueka, near Nelson on the north end of the South Island, New Zealand. She is wearing a 'hei-tiki,' a traditional Maori pendant usually made out of pounamu (greenstone).

Pare, a young Maori woman with moko (facial tattoo). She is wearing a feather cloak further adorned with peacock feathers. Photograph taken by William Henry Thomas Partington, 1900

Pare, a young Maori woman with moko (facial tattoo). She is wearing a feather cloak further adorned with peacock feathers. Photograph taken by William Henry Thomas Partington, 1900

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