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A womens strength isnt just about how much she can handle before she breaks, its also about how much she must handle after she is broken.

A womens strength isnt just about how much she can handle before she breaks, its also about how much she must handle after she is broken.

Each main Legend of Korra villain represents a different political ideology. Even the more minor villains like Varrick (who is not always necessarily a villain) and the Earth Queen represent ideologies as well: Capitalism and Absolute Monarchy, respectively

Each main Legend of Korra villain represents a different political ideology. Even the more minor villains like Varrick (who is not always necessarily a villain) and the Earth Queen represent ideologies as well: Capitalism and Absolute Monarchy, respectively

I can't be the only one who didn't understand the Korra Season 2 ending. I miss the Gaang :(

I can't be the only one who didn't understand the Korra Season 2 ending. I miss the Gaang :(

What's really great about this, I think, is that this is a TV show whose primary audience is children, and yet there's a reason why so much of the audience IS adults (even adults without kids). If you talk to anyone my age (let's say, late 20s), all of us love the adults in Legend of Korra. It reminds us that there are still awesome people we can grow up to be (admittedly, most of us don't have Toph and Katara for mothers, but still. xP)

What's really great about this, I think, is that this is a TV show whose primary audience is children, and yet there's a reason why so much of the audience IS adults (even adults without kids). If you talk to anyone my age (let's say, late 20s), all of us love the adults in Legend of Korra. It reminds us that there are still awesome people we can grow up to be (admittedly, most of us don't have Toph and Katara for mothers, but still. xP)

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